Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Smoking, a Dangerous Habit for the Skin

Smoking, a Dangerous Habit for the Skin We are all acutely aware of the causal association of UV radiation exposure and skin cancers, and we warn our patients about the hazards of sun exposure. In the August issue of this journal, Leonardi-Bee et al1 published an important systematic review and meta-analysis on the effects of smoking on the risk of nonmelanoma skin cancer. Their study clearly demonstrated that smoking increases the risk of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma, although it does not appear to modify the risk of basal cell carcinoma. Verkouteren and Nijsten,2 in commentary published in the same issue, shed light on the practical implications of the findings and explain how they translate into clinical practice. The authors of this comment justifiably urge us to take advantage of this association and “collaborate with smoking cessation programs as an element of good patient care,”2 suggesting that “physicians could make use of the current cancer experience in motivating patients to discontinue smoking, which has many additional important health benefits.”2 I would like to raise another point that I believe will be even more alarming to the smoking public, who, in spite of our efforts to promote our antismoking campaign, appear not to be deterred by the threats of cancer and death. As dermatologists, we are “lucky” to possess what may be even more convincing reasons and motivations for supporting the antismoking campaign. We propose that, for many smokers, particularly the young ones, the evidence that smoking is associated with irreversible aesthetic damage (ie, premature aging and wrinkling of the skin and discoloring of the teeth3) and deleterious effects on male sexual potency4 will be much more compelling than the proof that smoking can cause skin cancer and kill. One glance at the figures of how much is spent on fillers for wrinkles and teeth-whitening procedures is enough to reveal what the public really cares about. As such, we dermatologists are armed with extremely potent ammunition in the war against smoking, and we should use it to the fullest. Articles such as the analysis of Leonardi-Bee et al1 and the comments of Verkouteren and Nijsten2 are a most welcome addition to our armamentarium. Back to top Article Information Correspondence: Dr Wolf, Dermatology Unit, Kaplan Medical Center, 76100 Rechovot, Israel (wolf_r@netvision.net.il). Conflict of Interest Disclosures: None reported. References 1. Leonardi-Bee J, Ellison T, Bath-Hextall F. Smoking and the risk of nonmelanoma skin cancer: systematic review and meta-analysis. Arch Dermatol. 2012;148(8):939-94622711192PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref 2. Verkouteren JA, Nijsten T. Smoking, a dangerous habit for the skin: comment on “Smoking and the risk of nonmelanoma skin cancer.” Arch Dermatol. 2012;148(8):94622710425PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref 3. Wolf R. Use and abuse of tobacco, alcohol, and drugs. In: Parish L, Brenner S, Ramos-e-Silva M, eds. Women's Dermatology: From Infancy to Maturity. New York, NY: Pathenon Publishing Group; 2001:491-514 4. Chew KK, Bremner A, Stuckey B, Earle C, Jamrozik K. Is the relationship between cigarette smoking and male erectile dysfunction independent of cardiovascular disease? findings from a population-based cross-sectional study. J Sex Med. 2009;6(1):222-23118761596PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA Dermatology American Medical Association

Smoking, a Dangerous Habit for the Skin

JAMA Dermatology , Volume 149 (3) – Mar 1, 2013

Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-medical-association/smoking-a-dangerous-habit-for-the-skin-80QLu0hh47
Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 2013 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
2168-6068
eISSN
2168-6084
DOI
10.1001/jamadermatol.2013.2653
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

We are all acutely aware of the causal association of UV radiation exposure and skin cancers, and we warn our patients about the hazards of sun exposure. In the August issue of this journal, Leonardi-Bee et al1 published an important systematic review and meta-analysis on the effects of smoking on the risk of nonmelanoma skin cancer. Their study clearly demonstrated that smoking increases the risk of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma, although it does not appear to modify the risk of basal cell carcinoma. Verkouteren and Nijsten,2 in commentary published in the same issue, shed light on the practical implications of the findings and explain how they translate into clinical practice. The authors of this comment justifiably urge us to take advantage of this association and “collaborate with smoking cessation programs as an element of good patient care,”2 suggesting that “physicians could make use of the current cancer experience in motivating patients to discontinue smoking, which has many additional important health benefits.”2 I would like to raise another point that I believe will be even more alarming to the smoking public, who, in spite of our efforts to promote our antismoking campaign, appear not to be deterred by the threats of cancer and death. As dermatologists, we are “lucky” to possess what may be even more convincing reasons and motivations for supporting the antismoking campaign. We propose that, for many smokers, particularly the young ones, the evidence that smoking is associated with irreversible aesthetic damage (ie, premature aging and wrinkling of the skin and discoloring of the teeth3) and deleterious effects on male sexual potency4 will be much more compelling than the proof that smoking can cause skin cancer and kill. One glance at the figures of how much is spent on fillers for wrinkles and teeth-whitening procedures is enough to reveal what the public really cares about. As such, we dermatologists are armed with extremely potent ammunition in the war against smoking, and we should use it to the fullest. Articles such as the analysis of Leonardi-Bee et al1 and the comments of Verkouteren and Nijsten2 are a most welcome addition to our armamentarium. Back to top Article Information Correspondence: Dr Wolf, Dermatology Unit, Kaplan Medical Center, 76100 Rechovot, Israel (wolf_r@netvision.net.il). Conflict of Interest Disclosures: None reported. References 1. Leonardi-Bee J, Ellison T, Bath-Hextall F. Smoking and the risk of nonmelanoma skin cancer: systematic review and meta-analysis. Arch Dermatol. 2012;148(8):939-94622711192PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref 2. Verkouteren JA, Nijsten T. Smoking, a dangerous habit for the skin: comment on “Smoking and the risk of nonmelanoma skin cancer.” Arch Dermatol. 2012;148(8):94622710425PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref 3. Wolf R. Use and abuse of tobacco, alcohol, and drugs. In: Parish L, Brenner S, Ramos-e-Silva M, eds. Women's Dermatology: From Infancy to Maturity. New York, NY: Pathenon Publishing Group; 2001:491-514 4. Chew KK, Bremner A, Stuckey B, Earle C, Jamrozik K. Is the relationship between cigarette smoking and male erectile dysfunction independent of cardiovascular disease? findings from a population-based cross-sectional study. J Sex Med. 2009;6(1):222-23118761596PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref

Journal

JAMA DermatologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Mar 1, 2013

Keywords: smoking,habits,skin

References