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Smoke Carcinogen Affects Fetus

Smoke Carcinogen Affects Fetus Researchers at the University of Minnesota Cancer Center have offered the first direct evidence that a carcinogenic chemical is transmitted to the fetus when a pregnant woman smokes. In findings presented last month at a national meeting of the American Chemical Society, Stephen Hecht, PhD, analyzed the first urine of 48 newborns born to smoking and nonsmoking mothers. The urine samples were provided by collaborators in Germany. In 22 of 31 samples from infants of smoking mothers, Hecht detected by-products of NNK, a nicotine-derived chemical that is unique to tobacco and is one of the strongest carcinogens in tobacco smoke. Infants of nonsmoking mothers had no NNK metabolites in their urine. Hecht reported that levels of NNK by-products in the newborns' urine were about 10% of those usually detected in the urine of adult smokers. He said that level is substantial, since the fetus is exposed to NNK throughout pregnancy. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

Smoke Carcinogen Affects Fetus

JAMA , Volume 280 (12) – Sep 23, 1998

Smoke Carcinogen Affects Fetus

Abstract

Researchers at the University of Minnesota Cancer Center have offered the first direct evidence that a carcinogenic chemical is transmitted to the fetus when a pregnant woman smokes. In findings presented last month at a national meeting of the American Chemical Society, Stephen Hecht, PhD, analyzed the first urine of 48 newborns born to smoking and nonsmoking mothers. The urine samples were provided by collaborators in Germany. In 22 of 31 samples from infants of smoking mothers, Hecht...
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1998 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.280.12.1041-JQU80006-4-1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Researchers at the University of Minnesota Cancer Center have offered the first direct evidence that a carcinogenic chemical is transmitted to the fetus when a pregnant woman smokes. In findings presented last month at a national meeting of the American Chemical Society, Stephen Hecht, PhD, analyzed the first urine of 48 newborns born to smoking and nonsmoking mothers. The urine samples were provided by collaborators in Germany. In 22 of 31 samples from infants of smoking mothers, Hecht detected by-products of NNK, a nicotine-derived chemical that is unique to tobacco and is one of the strongest carcinogens in tobacco smoke. Infants of nonsmoking mothers had no NNK metabolites in their urine. Hecht reported that levels of NNK by-products in the newborns' urine were about 10% of those usually detected in the urine of adult smokers. He said that level is substantial, since the fetus is exposed to NNK throughout pregnancy.

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Sep 23, 1998

Keywords: carcinogens,fetus,smoke

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