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SLEEP DEPRIVATION

SLEEP DEPRIVATION The effects of prolonged wakefulness were studied in a man who had been hospitalized for nervous disorders on three previous occasions. After the third hospitalization he had worked successfully under exacting conditions for six years, until he subjected himself to two periods of sleep deprivation. The first period of 89 hours precipitated an acute state of confusion from which he quickly recovered. The second period produced hallucinations, delusions, and complete disorganization. It was terminated at 168 hours and 33 minutes, but the psychotic symptoms and personality changes persisted. His affairs became confused, and he sought treatment. After four months of hospitalization he returned to work. He has been in reasonably good health for more than a year since that time. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

SLEEP DEPRIVATION

JAMA , Volume 171 (1) – Sep 5, 1959

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1959 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1959.03010190013003
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The effects of prolonged wakefulness were studied in a man who had been hospitalized for nervous disorders on three previous occasions. After the third hospitalization he had worked successfully under exacting conditions for six years, until he subjected himself to two periods of sleep deprivation. The first period of 89 hours precipitated an acute state of confusion from which he quickly recovered. The second period produced hallucinations, delusions, and complete disorganization. It was terminated at 168 hours and 33 minutes, but the psychotic symptoms and personality changes persisted. His affairs became confused, and he sought treatment. After four months of hospitalization he returned to work. He has been in reasonably good health for more than a year since that time.

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Sep 5, 1959

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