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Sir Harold Gillies

Sir Harold Gillies This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables. Abstract SIR Harold Gillies (1882-1960), Giles, as his friends called him, ranks high in the surgical world and, more than any one other person, was instrumental in the founding of plastic surgery as a specialty. He was in every respect a character (Fig 1). To explain what this means comparison may be drawn with the senior ophthalmologist at King's College Hospital in the early days, Professor McHardy. This man was of imposing stature and of remarkable individuality. When he visited the eye ward, a rather small room with a highly polished floor, he kept his top hat on to avoid draughts as he made his ward-round. After entering the room he walked very gingerly to the fireplace, took the shovel, raked out some ashes and scattered them over the floor, as one would over an icy path, to the sister's silent disgust. There are few characters of this caliber in medicine http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Otolaryngology American Medical Association

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1966 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9977
DOI
10.1001/archotol.1966.00760020374017
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables. Abstract SIR Harold Gillies (1882-1960), Giles, as his friends called him, ranks high in the surgical world and, more than any one other person, was instrumental in the founding of plastic surgery as a specialty. He was in every respect a character (Fig 1). To explain what this means comparison may be drawn with the senior ophthalmologist at King's College Hospital in the early days, Professor McHardy. This man was of imposing stature and of remarkable individuality. When he visited the eye ward, a rather small room with a highly polished floor, he kept his top hat on to avoid draughts as he made his ward-round. After entering the room he walked very gingerly to the fireplace, took the shovel, raked out some ashes and scattered them over the floor, as one would over an icy path, to the sister's silent disgust. There are few characters of this caliber in medicine

Journal

Archives of OtolaryngologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Apr 1, 1966

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