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SINUS TRACT OF DENTAL ORIGIN

SINUS TRACT OF DENTAL ORIGIN Abstract Sutton and Sutton1 state that the rarely mentioned sinus tract of dental origin can lead to an asymptomatic cold abscess which eventually ruptures through the skin. Because of gravitational forces, the fistula usually terminates on the chin. Anderson,2 in a complete review of the subject, cites the fact that the cutaneous findings may simulate actinomycosis or granuloma pyogenicum. REPORT OF A CASE Mr. J. D., 24 yr. old, was first seen on Nov. 14, 1949, with a granuloma pyogenicum located on the midaspect of the chin (Fig. 1). It had persisted for eight months despite repeated electrocoagulation, antibiotics, and radiation. Past history revealed that the patient had received a blow on the chin during a fight a year previously.On physical examination, no obvious dental defects were found, but roentgenograms demonstrated a large apical abscess surrounding the two lower incisors (Fig. 2). After extraction of these two incisors, References 1. Sutton, R. L., and Sutton, R. L., Jr.: Diseases of the Skin , ed. 10, St. Louis, C. V. Mosby Company, 1939, p. 1490. 2. Anderson, P.: Persistent Sinus Tracts of Dental Origin , Arch. Dermat. & Syph. 35:1062 ( (June) ) 1947. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png A.M.A. Archives of Dermatology & Syphilology American Medical Association

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1951 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0096-5979
DOI
10.1001/archderm.1951.01570110107017
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Sutton and Sutton1 state that the rarely mentioned sinus tract of dental origin can lead to an asymptomatic cold abscess which eventually ruptures through the skin. Because of gravitational forces, the fistula usually terminates on the chin. Anderson,2 in a complete review of the subject, cites the fact that the cutaneous findings may simulate actinomycosis or granuloma pyogenicum. REPORT OF A CASE Mr. J. D., 24 yr. old, was first seen on Nov. 14, 1949, with a granuloma pyogenicum located on the midaspect of the chin (Fig. 1). It had persisted for eight months despite repeated electrocoagulation, antibiotics, and radiation. Past history revealed that the patient had received a blow on the chin during a fight a year previously.On physical examination, no obvious dental defects were found, but roentgenograms demonstrated a large apical abscess surrounding the two lower incisors (Fig. 2). After extraction of these two incisors, References 1. Sutton, R. L., and Sutton, R. L., Jr.: Diseases of the Skin , ed. 10, St. Louis, C. V. Mosby Company, 1939, p. 1490. 2. Anderson, P.: Persistent Sinus Tracts of Dental Origin , Arch. Dermat. & Syph. 35:1062 ( (June) ) 1947.

Journal

A.M.A. Archives of Dermatology & SyphilologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Nov 1, 1951

References