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SIGNIFICANCE OF BLEEDING GUMS

SIGNIFICANCE OF BLEEDING GUMS Periodontal disease (pyorrhea) is by far the major cause of tooth loss in individuals over 35 years of age.1 Although some forms of periodontal disease progress with little outward manifestation, the characteristic diagnostic signs most frequently seen by the physician are gingivitis and bleeding of the gums. Gingival inflammation is present to some degree in most persons who eat chiefly soft and cooked foods, and gums may bleed from a variety of causes, local and systemic. However, local irritation almost always is the primary cause, and indeed it is the rare case in which systemic factors cause bleeding of the gums in the absence of some form of local irritation.2 Dental calculus, trauma, malocclusion, food impaction, and ill-fitting prostheses or restorations are a few of the common local factors.3 It would be a mistake, however, to consider every gingival hemorrhage as a manifestation of uncomplicated gingivitis or http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

SIGNIFICANCE OF BLEEDING GUMS

JAMA , Volume 160 (12) – Mar 24, 1956

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1956 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1956.02960470052013
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Periodontal disease (pyorrhea) is by far the major cause of tooth loss in individuals over 35 years of age.1 Although some forms of periodontal disease progress with little outward manifestation, the characteristic diagnostic signs most frequently seen by the physician are gingivitis and bleeding of the gums. Gingival inflammation is present to some degree in most persons who eat chiefly soft and cooked foods, and gums may bleed from a variety of causes, local and systemic. However, local irritation almost always is the primary cause, and indeed it is the rare case in which systemic factors cause bleeding of the gums in the absence of some form of local irritation.2 Dental calculus, trauma, malocclusion, food impaction, and ill-fitting prostheses or restorations are a few of the common local factors.3 It would be a mistake, however, to consider every gingival hemorrhage as a manifestation of uncomplicated gingivitis or

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Mar 24, 1956

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