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SICKLE CELL ANEMIA

SICKLE CELL ANEMIA Recent medical literature contains the records of three patients, all negroes, or negroes with an admixture of Caucasian blood, in whom severe anemia, characterized by certain peculiar morphologic alterations of the red blood cells, was present. The first case was reported by Herrick.1 Washburn2 published the records of a patient whose blood showed similar changes, and Cook and Meyer3 reported the third example of this rare type of anemia. REPORT OF CASE The following record is presented in some detail on account of the rarity of the disease: History. —C. P., a negro, aged 21, was admitted to the Johns Hopkins Hospital, March 15, 1915, complaining of general weakness. The family history was fragmentary, and no evidence was adduced to indicate that any other member of the family had suffered from symptoms similar to his. The patient was born in Virginia and had never been farther than http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

SICKLE CELL ANEMIA

JAMA , Volume 79 (16) – Oct 14, 1922

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1922 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1922.02640160038012
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Recent medical literature contains the records of three patients, all negroes, or negroes with an admixture of Caucasian blood, in whom severe anemia, characterized by certain peculiar morphologic alterations of the red blood cells, was present. The first case was reported by Herrick.1 Washburn2 published the records of a patient whose blood showed similar changes, and Cook and Meyer3 reported the third example of this rare type of anemia. REPORT OF CASE The following record is presented in some detail on account of the rarity of the disease: History. —C. P., a negro, aged 21, was admitted to the Johns Hopkins Hospital, March 15, 1915, complaining of general weakness. The family history was fragmentary, and no evidence was adduced to indicate that any other member of the family had suffered from symptoms similar to his. The patient was born in Virginia and had never been farther than

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Oct 14, 1922

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