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Should We Target Insulin Resistance to Prevent Dementia Due to Alzheimer Disease?

Should We Target Insulin Resistance to Prevent Dementia Due to Alzheimer Disease? EDITORIAL Should We Target Insulin Resistance to Prevent Dementia Due to Alzheimer Disease? HE ARTICLE BY BAKER ET AL IN THIS ISSUE general, the associations tend to be stronger with vascu- of the Archives is an important piece of evi- lar dementia than with clinically diagnosed AD. The evi- dence supporting the hypothesis that in- dence from autopsy studies is mixed. Some autopsy stud- sulin resistance contributes to Alzheimer ies show that persons with diabetes have a higher burden T disease (AD). Baker et al report that insu- of cerebrovascular disease and less AD pathology than 4,5 lin resistance in persons with normal cognition and pre- expected, but a recent study reported an association be- diabetes or early diabetes without treatment is associ- tween insulin resistance (measured in a fashion similar ated with reductions in cerebral glucose metabolic rate to that of the study by Baker et al) a decade before au- (CMRglu) measured with fludeoxyglucose F 18– topsy and AD pathology. Given this body of evidence, positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) in frontal, tem- there are several important questions for investigators poroparietal, and cingulate regions, similar to those ob- studying the relation of insulin resistance and AD, and served http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA Neurology American Medical Association

Should We Target Insulin Resistance to Prevent Dementia Due to Alzheimer Disease?

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2011 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
2168-6149
eISSN
2168-6157
DOI
10.1001/archneurol.2010.339
pmid
21220672
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

EDITORIAL Should We Target Insulin Resistance to Prevent Dementia Due to Alzheimer Disease? HE ARTICLE BY BAKER ET AL IN THIS ISSUE general, the associations tend to be stronger with vascu- of the Archives is an important piece of evi- lar dementia than with clinically diagnosed AD. The evi- dence supporting the hypothesis that in- dence from autopsy studies is mixed. Some autopsy stud- sulin resistance contributes to Alzheimer ies show that persons with diabetes have a higher burden T disease (AD). Baker et al report that insu- of cerebrovascular disease and less AD pathology than 4,5 lin resistance in persons with normal cognition and pre- expected, but a recent study reported an association be- diabetes or early diabetes without treatment is associ- tween insulin resistance (measured in a fashion similar ated with reductions in cerebral glucose metabolic rate to that of the study by Baker et al) a decade before au- (CMRglu) measured with fludeoxyglucose F 18– topsy and AD pathology. Given this body of evidence, positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) in frontal, tem- there are several important questions for investigators poroparietal, and cingulate regions, similar to those ob- studying the relation of insulin resistance and AD, and served

Journal

JAMA NeurologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jan 1, 2011

References