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Should Hormone Therapy Be Used to Prevent Depressive Symptoms During the Menopause Transition?

Should Hormone Therapy Be Used to Prevent Depressive Symptoms During the Menopause Transition? Opinion EDITORIAL Should Hormone Therapy Be Used to Prevent Depressive Symptoms During the Menopause Transition? Hadine Joffe, MD, MSc; Martha Hickey, BA(Hons), MBChB, MSc, FRCOG, FRANZCOG, MD In this issue of JAMA Psychiatry, Gordon et al report results of this subgroup (42 women), this observation is consistent with larger prospective studies indicating that the early peri- from a 12-month randomized clinical trial of estrogen plus pro- gestin hormone therapy (HT) vs placebo for the prevention of menopause confers heightened vulnerability to depressive 8,9 depressive symptoms in 172 symptoms, perhaps owing to greater variability in circulat- euthymic perimenopausal ing estradiol concentrations during this reproductive stage. Related article page 149 and early postmenopausal A limitation of this study is that we do not know whether women. Using a random- women who developed elevated Center for Epidemiological ized, parallel-arm placebo-controlled design, they found that Studies Depression Scale scores were experiencing an epi- women assigned to placebo were twice as likely to develop sode of major depression because the sensitivity and speci- clinically significant depressive symptoms compared with ficity of this Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression those randomized to HT. During 12 months of continuous treat- Scale cutoff are 87% and 70%, respectively. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA Psychiatry American Medical Association

Should Hormone Therapy Be Used to Prevent Depressive Symptoms During the Menopause Transition?

JAMA Psychiatry , Volume 75 (2) – Feb 10, 2018

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2018 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
2168-622X
eISSN
2168-6238
DOI
10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2017.3945
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Opinion EDITORIAL Should Hormone Therapy Be Used to Prevent Depressive Symptoms During the Menopause Transition? Hadine Joffe, MD, MSc; Martha Hickey, BA(Hons), MBChB, MSc, FRCOG, FRANZCOG, MD In this issue of JAMA Psychiatry, Gordon et al report results of this subgroup (42 women), this observation is consistent with larger prospective studies indicating that the early peri- from a 12-month randomized clinical trial of estrogen plus pro- gestin hormone therapy (HT) vs placebo for the prevention of menopause confers heightened vulnerability to depressive 8,9 depressive symptoms in 172 symptoms, perhaps owing to greater variability in circulat- euthymic perimenopausal ing estradiol concentrations during this reproductive stage. Related article page 149 and early postmenopausal A limitation of this study is that we do not know whether women. Using a random- women who developed elevated Center for Epidemiological ized, parallel-arm placebo-controlled design, they found that Studies Depression Scale scores were experiencing an epi- women assigned to placebo were twice as likely to develop sode of major depression because the sensitivity and speci- clinically significant depressive symptoms compared with ficity of this Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression those randomized to HT. During 12 months of continuous treat- Scale cutoff are 87% and 70%, respectively.

Journal

JAMA PsychiatryAmerican Medical Association

Published: Feb 10, 2018

References