Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

SHINGUARD TYPE OR LICHEN PLANUS OCREAFORMIS

SHINGUARD TYPE OR LICHEN PLANUS OCREAFORMIS In the majority of cases of lichen planus the diagnosis offers no great difficulty, while there are aberrant types which require considerable skill in their interpretation. To these belongs the case here presented, which is of extreme rarity, no duplicate of it ever having been recorded. For this reason its demonstration before the Chicago Derm atological Society, and later at the clinical session of the American Dermatological Association in Chicago, 1914, elicited very intere s t ing discussion.1 And while some difference of opinion existed, yet the majority of the members accepted the diagnosis — lichen planus. History. —The patient was admitted to the hospital, Jan. 12, 1913, and the following account of his illness was secured: He was a Russian, aged 63, glazier, married, and the father of two healthy children. He has always been of temperate habits, has had no venereal or skin disease, and knows of none http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

SHINGUARD TYPE OR LICHEN PLANUS OCREAFORMIS

JAMA , Volume LXVII (22) – Nov 25, 1916

Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-medical-association/shinguard-type-or-lichen-planus-ocreaformis-kUDHbS8FZQ
Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1916 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1916.02590220024006
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In the majority of cases of lichen planus the diagnosis offers no great difficulty, while there are aberrant types which require considerable skill in their interpretation. To these belongs the case here presented, which is of extreme rarity, no duplicate of it ever having been recorded. For this reason its demonstration before the Chicago Derm atological Society, and later at the clinical session of the American Dermatological Association in Chicago, 1914, elicited very intere s t ing discussion.1 And while some difference of opinion existed, yet the majority of the members accepted the diagnosis — lichen planus. History. —The patient was admitted to the hospital, Jan. 12, 1913, and the following account of his illness was secured: He was a Russian, aged 63, glazier, married, and the father of two healthy children. He has always been of temperate habits, has had no venereal or skin disease, and knows of none

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Nov 25, 1916

There are no references for this article.