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Serum ?-Glutamyltransferase (GGT) and Thyroid Disease

Serum ?-Glutamyltransferase (GGT) and Thyroid Disease Abstract To the Editor. —We read with interest the article by Azizi entitled "γ-Glutamyl Transpeptidase Levels in Thyroid Disease" in the January Archives (1982;142:79-81). We have studied the serum GGT activity in 24 patients with untreated thyroid diseases—12 with hyperthyroidism (ten female and two male patients, aged 26 to 80 years; mean ± SEM, 58.16 ± 5.23 years) and 12 with hypothyroidism (eight female and four male patients, aged 12 to 70 years; mean ± SEM, 52.66 ± 4.81 years). A group of eight female and four male normal volunteers served as control subjects. Their mean ± SEM age was 35.91 ± 1.92 years. The diagnosis of thyroid disease was based on clinical findings and measurement of serum free thyroxine (T4) index and thyrotropin level. Serum GGT was assayed by a kinetic-spectrophotometric method according to Szasz.1 None of the patients or control subjects with conditions known to modifier serum References 1. Szasz G: Kinetic photometric method for serum γ-glutamyl transpeptidase. Clin Chem 1969;15:124-136. 2. Rosalki SB: γ-glutamyl transpeptidase , in Bodansky O, Latner AL (eds): Advanced Clinical Chemistry . New York, Academic Press Inc, 1975, vol 17, pp 53-107. 3. Lum G, Gambino R: Serum γ-glutamyl transpeptidase activity as an indicator of disease of liver, pancreas, or bone. Clin Chem 1972; 18:358-362. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Internal Medicine American Medical Association

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1983 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9926
eISSN
1538-3679
DOI
10.1001/archinte.1983.00350050240050
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract To the Editor. —We read with interest the article by Azizi entitled "γ-Glutamyl Transpeptidase Levels in Thyroid Disease" in the January Archives (1982;142:79-81). We have studied the serum GGT activity in 24 patients with untreated thyroid diseases—12 with hyperthyroidism (ten female and two male patients, aged 26 to 80 years; mean ± SEM, 58.16 ± 5.23 years) and 12 with hypothyroidism (eight female and four male patients, aged 12 to 70 years; mean ± SEM, 52.66 ± 4.81 years). A group of eight female and four male normal volunteers served as control subjects. Their mean ± SEM age was 35.91 ± 1.92 years. The diagnosis of thyroid disease was based on clinical findings and measurement of serum free thyroxine (T4) index and thyrotropin level. Serum GGT was assayed by a kinetic-spectrophotometric method according to Szasz.1 None of the patients or control subjects with conditions known to modifier serum References 1. Szasz G: Kinetic photometric method for serum γ-glutamyl transpeptidase. Clin Chem 1969;15:124-136. 2. Rosalki SB: γ-glutamyl transpeptidase , in Bodansky O, Latner AL (eds): Advanced Clinical Chemistry . New York, Academic Press Inc, 1975, vol 17, pp 53-107. 3. Lum G, Gambino R: Serum γ-glutamyl transpeptidase activity as an indicator of disease of liver, pancreas, or bone. Clin Chem 1972; 18:358-362.

Journal

Archives of Internal MedicineAmerican Medical Association

Published: May 1, 1983

References