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Self-Epithelization of Dermal Grafts

Self-Epithelization of Dermal Grafts Abstract THE USE of dermal grafts in head and neck surgery to protect the carotid artery from "blow outs" and to protect the esophageal suture line against fistulae was introduced by Corso and Gerald in 1963.1 These authors noted in their report that when there was skin breakdown over the graft it became epithelized and this epithelization appeared to come from the graft itself. One of us ( G. F. Reed) has made the same clinical observation.2 This apparent self-epithelization of dermal grafts, when exposed, becomes of great potential clinical significance. If true, one might use this grafting material to take advantage of its strength and viability in applications where it would be purposely exposed, if one could expect subsequent self-epithelization. Considerable work has been published documenting the fate of skin appendages in buried dermal implants. These studies indicate loss of hair follicles and sebaceous glands in approximately 2 to References 1. Corso, P.F., and Gerald, F.P.: Use of Autogenous Dermis for Protection of the Carotid Artery and Pharyngeal Suture Lines in Radical Head and Neck Surgery , Surg Gynec Obstet 117:37 ( (July) ) 1963. 2. Reed, G.F.: Use of Dermal Grafts in Otolaryngology , Ann Otol 74:769 ( (Sept) ) 1965. 3. Peer, L.A., and Paddock, R.: Histologic Studies on the Fate of Deeply Implanted Dermal Grafts: Observations on Sections of Implants Buried From One Week to One Year , Arch Surg 34:268, 1937.Crossref 4. Thompson, N.: The Subcutaneous Dermis Graft , Plast Reconstr Surg 26:1, 1960.Crossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Otolaryngology American Medical Association

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1968 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9977
DOI
10.1001/archotol.1968.00760060520015
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract THE USE of dermal grafts in head and neck surgery to protect the carotid artery from "blow outs" and to protect the esophageal suture line against fistulae was introduced by Corso and Gerald in 1963.1 These authors noted in their report that when there was skin breakdown over the graft it became epithelized and this epithelization appeared to come from the graft itself. One of us ( G. F. Reed) has made the same clinical observation.2 This apparent self-epithelization of dermal grafts, when exposed, becomes of great potential clinical significance. If true, one might use this grafting material to take advantage of its strength and viability in applications where it would be purposely exposed, if one could expect subsequent self-epithelization. Considerable work has been published documenting the fate of skin appendages in buried dermal implants. These studies indicate loss of hair follicles and sebaceous glands in approximately 2 to References 1. Corso, P.F., and Gerald, F.P.: Use of Autogenous Dermis for Protection of the Carotid Artery and Pharyngeal Suture Lines in Radical Head and Neck Surgery , Surg Gynec Obstet 117:37 ( (July) ) 1963. 2. Reed, G.F.: Use of Dermal Grafts in Otolaryngology , Ann Otol 74:769 ( (Sept) ) 1965. 3. Peer, L.A., and Paddock, R.: Histologic Studies on the Fate of Deeply Implanted Dermal Grafts: Observations on Sections of Implants Buried From One Week to One Year , Arch Surg 34:268, 1937.Crossref 4. Thompson, N.: The Subcutaneous Dermis Graft , Plast Reconstr Surg 26:1, 1960.Crossref

Journal

Archives of OtolaryngologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: May 1, 1968

References

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