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Selecting the Best Candidates for Lung Cancer Screening

Selecting the Best Candidates for Lung Cancer Screening Opinion EDITORIAL LESS IS MORE Tanner Caverly, MD, MPH The Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) re- equal), the lower the likelihood that screening will be ben- cently decided to reimburse for annual lung cancer screening eficial. Age alone is not a strong predictor of surgical risk. with low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) among per- Underlying comorbidities, such as heart failure or severe sons who meet the inclusion criteria for the National Lung Can- chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and functional sta- 1 7 cer Screening Trial (NLST). tus are much more important. The presence of multiple Those who have smoked for risk factors can result in very high risk for death related to Related article page 896 more than 30 pack-years, con- surgery. A model developed to predict in-hospital death fol- 8,9 tinue to smoke, or quit within lowing thoracic surgery suggests that the risk of death in the past 15 years and are 55 to 77 years old will be eligible for a healthy man older than 65 years undergoing an elective free annual LDCT screening—roughly 6% of the US popula- lobectomy for lung cancer is about 1%, which is similar to 2 10 tion older than 40 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA Internal Medicine American Medical Association

Selecting the Best Candidates for Lung Cancer Screening

JAMA Internal Medicine , Volume 175 (6) – Jun 1, 2015

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2015 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
2168-6106
eISSN
2168-6114
DOI
10.1001/jamainternmed.2015.1235
pmid
25844984
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Opinion EDITORIAL LESS IS MORE Tanner Caverly, MD, MPH The Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) re- equal), the lower the likelihood that screening will be ben- cently decided to reimburse for annual lung cancer screening eficial. Age alone is not a strong predictor of surgical risk. with low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) among per- Underlying comorbidities, such as heart failure or severe sons who meet the inclusion criteria for the National Lung Can- chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and functional sta- 1 7 cer Screening Trial (NLST). tus are much more important. The presence of multiple Those who have smoked for risk factors can result in very high risk for death related to Related article page 896 more than 30 pack-years, con- surgery. A model developed to predict in-hospital death fol- 8,9 tinue to smoke, or quit within lowing thoracic surgery suggests that the risk of death in the past 15 years and are 55 to 77 years old will be eligible for a healthy man older than 65 years undergoing an elective free annual LDCT screening—roughly 6% of the US popula- lobectomy for lung cancer is about 1%, which is similar to 2 10 tion older than 40

Journal

JAMA Internal MedicineAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jun 1, 2015

References