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Screening for Traumatic Childhood Experiences in Health Care Settings

Screening for Traumatic Childhood Experiences in Health Care Settings Screening for Traumatic Childhood Experiences in Health Care Settings Invited Commentary Invited Commentary David Finkelhor, PhD; Lucy Berliner, MSW The heartfelt essay by Dr Austin captures well the experi- tioning and need to be given advanced warnings and ence of many survivors of childhood sexual abuse and other options. traumatic and adverse experiences. Faced with medical his- In an ideal process, the infrastructure behind a fully com- tory questionnaires, they may feel ambivalent about disclos- prehensive response would include training for health care pro- ing and disappointed with the fessionals; having available informational resources such as follow-up when they do. pamphlets, videos, or websites; and the preplanning of a re- Related article ferral procedure. The exact options would depend on the re- As she points out, screen- ing for the variety of adverse experiences has been rapidly sources within the settings. Some practices now employ so- increasing, in wake of the recognition of their prevalence cial workers, care managers, and navigators who can contribute and their contribution to poor health. But while screening is to effective responses. But in other cases, referrals will need proliferating, it is not clear how beneficial it has been for pa- to be vetted http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA Internal Medicine American Medical Association

Screening for Traumatic Childhood Experiences in Health Care Settings

JAMA Internal Medicine , Volume 181 (7) – Jul 3, 2021

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2021 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
2168-6106
eISSN
2168-6114
DOI
10.1001/jamainternmed.2021.1442
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Screening for Traumatic Childhood Experiences in Health Care Settings Invited Commentary Invited Commentary David Finkelhor, PhD; Lucy Berliner, MSW The heartfelt essay by Dr Austin captures well the experi- tioning and need to be given advanced warnings and ence of many survivors of childhood sexual abuse and other options. traumatic and adverse experiences. Faced with medical his- In an ideal process, the infrastructure behind a fully com- tory questionnaires, they may feel ambivalent about disclos- prehensive response would include training for health care pro- ing and disappointed with the fessionals; having available informational resources such as follow-up when they do. pamphlets, videos, or websites; and the preplanning of a re- Related article ferral procedure. The exact options would depend on the re- As she points out, screen- ing for the variety of adverse experiences has been rapidly sources within the settings. Some practices now employ so- increasing, in wake of the recognition of their prevalence cial workers, care managers, and navigators who can contribute and their contribution to poor health. But while screening is to effective responses. But in other cases, referrals will need proliferating, it is not clear how beneficial it has been for pa- to be vetted

Journal

JAMA Internal MedicineAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jul 3, 2021

References