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Sclerosing Mesenteritis in a Child

Sclerosing Mesenteritis in a Child Abstract To the Editor.—Sclerosing mesenteritis is a rare condition of unknown origin that has been reported previously in seven children.1,2 We herein report an additional case in a child. Report of a Case.—A 5-year-old girl presented with increasing abdominal pain of seven days' duration. Her temperature was 39.2°C, and she appeared moderately ill. The abdomen was not distended. There was right-sided abdominal tenderness and fullness but no other peritoneal signs. The white blood cell count was 38 200/mm3 (38.2 × 109/L), with a severe left shift. Barium enema showed a mass on the medial wall of the ascending colon. At operation, a large amount of cloudy, foul-smelling, peritoneal fluid was noted. There was a large tumor attached to the medial (mesenteric) wall of the right colon and the hepatic flexure; it was extremely firm and adherent. The appendix and adjacent bowel appeared normal (Figure, top). References 1. Spark RB, YaKovac WC, Wagget J: Retractile sclerosing mesenteritis: Case report . Clin Pediatr 1971;10:119-122.Crossref 2. Reske M, Namiki H: Sclerosing mesenteritis: Report of two cases . Am J Clin Pathol 1975;64:661-667. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Surgery American Medical Association

Sclerosing Mesenteritis in a Child

Sclerosing Mesenteritis in a Child

Abstract

Abstract To the Editor.—Sclerosing mesenteritis is a rare condition of unknown origin that has been reported previously in seven children.1,2 We herein report an additional case in a child. Report of a Case.—A 5-year-old girl presented with increasing abdominal pain of seven days' duration. Her temperature was 39.2°C, and she appeared moderately ill. The abdomen was not distended. There was right-sided abdominal tenderness and fullness but no other peritoneal signs. The...
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1987 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0004-0010
eISSN
1538-3644
DOI
10.1001/archsurg.1987.01400180117023
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract To the Editor.—Sclerosing mesenteritis is a rare condition of unknown origin that has been reported previously in seven children.1,2 We herein report an additional case in a child. Report of a Case.—A 5-year-old girl presented with increasing abdominal pain of seven days' duration. Her temperature was 39.2°C, and she appeared moderately ill. The abdomen was not distended. There was right-sided abdominal tenderness and fullness but no other peritoneal signs. The white blood cell count was 38 200/mm3 (38.2 × 109/L), with a severe left shift. Barium enema showed a mass on the medial wall of the ascending colon. At operation, a large amount of cloudy, foul-smelling, peritoneal fluid was noted. There was a large tumor attached to the medial (mesenteric) wall of the right colon and the hepatic flexure; it was extremely firm and adherent. The appendix and adjacent bowel appeared normal (Figure, top). References 1. Spark RB, YaKovac WC, Wagget J: Retractile sclerosing mesenteritis: Case report . Clin Pediatr 1971;10:119-122.Crossref 2. Reske M, Namiki H: Sclerosing mesenteritis: Report of two cases . Am J Clin Pathol 1975;64:661-667.

Journal

Archives of SurgeryAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jun 1, 1987

References