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Scanning Electron Microscopy of Hydrophilic Contact Lenses

Scanning Electron Microscopy of Hydrophilic Contact Lenses Abstract Hydrated hydrophilic lenses of three different manufacturers (Griffen, Kontur, and Bausch and Lomb) were prepared for scanning electron microscopy utilizing air drying, freeze drying, and critical point drying techniques. Air dried lenses demonstrated artifacts analogous to those commonly seen in soft biological tissues when prepared in this manner. The freeze and critical point dried specimens showed better preservation of surface detail. Surfaces did not appear to have a porous architecture and no pores were seen at magnifications to 36,000 times. Surfaces of two of the lenses demonstrated conspicuous polishing marks which appeared to predispose to the adherence of debris, following wearing and cleaning. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was noted on the posterior surface of one lens. Varying the tonicity of the hydrating solution appeared to have little effect on the surface morphology of the lenses. References 1. Boyde A, Wood C: Preparation of animal tissues for surface scanning electron microscopy . J Micr 90:221-249, 1969.Crossref 2. Milauskas AT: Pseudomonas aeruginosa contamination of hydrophilic contact lenses and solutions. Trans Amer Acad Ophthal Otolaryng, to be published. 3. Takahashi GH, Goldstick TK, Fatt J: Physical properties of hydrophilic gel contact lenses . Brit Med J 1:142, 1966.Crossref 4. Beilby GT: The effects of heat and solvents on thin films of metal . Roy Soc Proc 72:226-235, 1903.Crossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Ophthalmology American Medical Association

Scanning Electron Microscopy of Hydrophilic Contact Lenses

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1972 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9950
eISSN
1538-3687
DOI
10.1001/archopht.1972.01000030289014
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Hydrated hydrophilic lenses of three different manufacturers (Griffen, Kontur, and Bausch and Lomb) were prepared for scanning electron microscopy utilizing air drying, freeze drying, and critical point drying techniques. Air dried lenses demonstrated artifacts analogous to those commonly seen in soft biological tissues when prepared in this manner. The freeze and critical point dried specimens showed better preservation of surface detail. Surfaces did not appear to have a porous architecture and no pores were seen at magnifications to 36,000 times. Surfaces of two of the lenses demonstrated conspicuous polishing marks which appeared to predispose to the adherence of debris, following wearing and cleaning. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was noted on the posterior surface of one lens. Varying the tonicity of the hydrating solution appeared to have little effect on the surface morphology of the lenses. References 1. Boyde A, Wood C: Preparation of animal tissues for surface scanning electron microscopy . J Micr 90:221-249, 1969.Crossref 2. Milauskas AT: Pseudomonas aeruginosa contamination of hydrophilic contact lenses and solutions. Trans Amer Acad Ophthal Otolaryng, to be published. 3. Takahashi GH, Goldstick TK, Fatt J: Physical properties of hydrophilic gel contact lenses . Brit Med J 1:142, 1966.Crossref 4. Beilby GT: The effects of heat and solvents on thin films of metal . Roy Soc Proc 72:226-235, 1903.Crossref

Journal

Archives of OphthalmologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Sep 1, 1972

References

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