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Rubella Syndrome After Inapparent Maternal Illness

Rubella Syndrome After Inapparent Maternal Illness Abstract SINCE the original reports by Gregg1 and Swan,2 it has been appreciated that rubella contracted during the first trimester of pregnancy can result in an infant born with malformations. It has become commonplace in evaluating deformed babies to ask about maternal illness in the first trimester—specifically rubella, with rash and fever. However, rubella may fail to show the typical rash, and may be manifested only by posterior auricular nodes, or may even be entirely subclinical.3 The cases which comprise the present report demonstrate that rubella, documented by virus isolation, can occur in the offspring of pregnancies in which no history of rubella in the mother can be elicited. A further difficulty is evident since the recent isolation of rubella virus from infants born of pregnancies complicated by maternal rubella.4 In cases of newborns with only patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) or only cataracts, when the maternal References 1. Gregg, N.M.: Congenital Cataract Following German Measles in the Mother , Trans Ophthal Soc Aust 3:35-46, 1942. 2. Swan, C.: Rubella in Pregnancy as an Aetiological Factor in Congenital Malformation, Stillbirth, Miscarriage and Abortion , J Obstet Gynaec Brit Comm 56:341, 591, 1949.Crossref 3. Brody, J.A., et al: Rubella Epidemic on St. Paul Island in the Pribilofs, 1964: I. Epidemiologic, Clinical and Serological Findings , JAMA 191:619, 1965.Crossref 4. Alford, C.A.; Neva, F.A.; and Weller, T.H.: Virologic and Seralogic Studies on Human Products of Conception After Maternal Rubella , New Eng J Med 271:1275, 1964.Crossref 5. Hardy, J., et al: Postnatal Transmission of Rubella Virus to Nurses , JAMA 191:1034, 1965.Crossref 6. Cooper, L.Z., et al: Rubella Contacts of Infants With Rubella-Associated Anomalies , Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report , 14:44-45 (No. (5) ) 1965. 7. Sever, J.L.; Schiff, G.M.; and Traub, R.G.: Rubella Virus , JAMA 182:663, 1962.Crossref 8. Brody, J.A.; Sever, J.L.; and Schiff, G.M.: Prevention of Rubella by Gamma Globulin During an Epidemic in Barrow, Alaska, in 1964 , New Eng J Med 272:127, 1965.Crossref 9. Rudolph, A.J., et al: Transplacental Rubella Infection in Newly Born Infants , JAMA 191:843, 1965.Crossref 10. Monif, G.R.G., et al: Portmortem Isolation of Rubella Virus From Three Children With Rubella-Syndrome Defects , Lancet 1:723, 1965.Crossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Diseases of Children American Medical Association

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1965 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0002-922X
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.1965.02090030464015
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract SINCE the original reports by Gregg1 and Swan,2 it has been appreciated that rubella contracted during the first trimester of pregnancy can result in an infant born with malformations. It has become commonplace in evaluating deformed babies to ask about maternal illness in the first trimester—specifically rubella, with rash and fever. However, rubella may fail to show the typical rash, and may be manifested only by posterior auricular nodes, or may even be entirely subclinical.3 The cases which comprise the present report demonstrate that rubella, documented by virus isolation, can occur in the offspring of pregnancies in which no history of rubella in the mother can be elicited. A further difficulty is evident since the recent isolation of rubella virus from infants born of pregnancies complicated by maternal rubella.4 In cases of newborns with only patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) or only cataracts, when the maternal References 1. Gregg, N.M.: Congenital Cataract Following German Measles in the Mother , Trans Ophthal Soc Aust 3:35-46, 1942. 2. Swan, C.: Rubella in Pregnancy as an Aetiological Factor in Congenital Malformation, Stillbirth, Miscarriage and Abortion , J Obstet Gynaec Brit Comm 56:341, 591, 1949.Crossref 3. Brody, J.A., et al: Rubella Epidemic on St. Paul Island in the Pribilofs, 1964: I. Epidemiologic, Clinical and Serological Findings , JAMA 191:619, 1965.Crossref 4. Alford, C.A.; Neva, F.A.; and Weller, T.H.: Virologic and Seralogic Studies on Human Products of Conception After Maternal Rubella , New Eng J Med 271:1275, 1964.Crossref 5. Hardy, J., et al: Postnatal Transmission of Rubella Virus to Nurses , JAMA 191:1034, 1965.Crossref 6. Cooper, L.Z., et al: Rubella Contacts of Infants With Rubella-Associated Anomalies , Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report , 14:44-45 (No. (5) ) 1965. 7. Sever, J.L.; Schiff, G.M.; and Traub, R.G.: Rubella Virus , JAMA 182:663, 1962.Crossref 8. Brody, J.A.; Sever, J.L.; and Schiff, G.M.: Prevention of Rubella by Gamma Globulin During an Epidemic in Barrow, Alaska, in 1964 , New Eng J Med 272:127, 1965.Crossref 9. Rudolph, A.J., et al: Transplacental Rubella Infection in Newly Born Infants , JAMA 191:843, 1965.Crossref 10. Monif, G.R.G., et al: Portmortem Isolation of Rubella Virus From Three Children With Rubella-Syndrome Defects , Lancet 1:723, 1965.Crossref

Journal

American Journal of Diseases of ChildrenAmerican Medical Association

Published: Oct 1, 1965

References