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Rubella: Studies on the Natural Disease: The Significance of Antibody Status and Communicability Among Young Women

Rubella: Studies on the Natural Disease: The Significance of Antibody Status and Communicability... Abstract EVER since the work of Gregg in 1941,1 physicians have become aware of the teratogenic effects of rubella contracted during the first trimester of pregnancy. Thus, an illness which previously had been considered a mild disease of childhood and adolescence became to be regarded as a serious problem. The availability of a method to determine immunity and an estimation of the risk of contracting rubella after exposure would be of great aid to physicians caring for the early pregnant woman when rubella is in the community. Recently, techniques have been developed which have made it possible to detect rubella virus and measure neutralizing antibody.2,3 Studies on experimental rubella have shown that human volunteers with preexisting neutralizing antibody were protected from subsequent viral challenge.4 The occurrence of a city-wide rubella epidemic in Cincinnati and an outbreak among personnel in the Children's Hospital outpatient clinic during the spring of References 1. Gregg, N.M.: Congenital Cataract Following German Measles in the Mother , Trans Opthal Soc Aust 3:35-46, 1941. 2. Parkman, P.D.; Buescher, E.L.; and Artenstein, M.S.: Recovery of Rubella Virus From Army Recruits , Proc Soc Exp Biol Med 111:225-230, 1962.Crossref 3. McCarthy, K.; Taylor-Robinson, C.H.; and Pellinger, S.E.: Isolation of Rubella Virus From Cases in Britain , Lancet 2:593-598, 1963.Crossref 4. Schiff, G.M.; Sever, J.L.; and Huebner, R.J.: Clinical and Laboratory Findings in Experimental Rubella , Arch Intern Med 116:537-543.Crossref 5. Schiff, G.M.; Sever, J.L.; and Huebner, R.J.: Rubella Virus: Neutralizing Antibody in Commercial Gamma Globulin , Science 142:58-60, 1963.Crossref 6. Sever, J.L.: Application of Microtechnique to Viral Serological Investigations , J Immun 88:320-329, 1962. 7. Sever, J.L.; Schiff, G.M.; and Huebner, R.J.: Frequency of Rubella Antibody Among Pregnant Women and Other Human and Animal Populations , Obstet Gynec 23:153-159, 1964. 8. Buescher, E.L., and Parkman, P.D.: Transmission of Rubella Virus in Military Populations, read before the 92nd meeting of the American Public Health Association, New York. Oct 7, 1964. 9. Schiff, G.M., and Dine, M.S.: Transmission of Rubella From Newborns , Amer J Dis Child , this issue, pp 447-451. 10. Schiff, G.M., et al: Studies on Congenital Rubella , Amer J Dis Child , this issue, pp 441-443. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Diseases of Children American Medical Association

Rubella: Studies on the Natural Disease: The Significance of Antibody Status and Communicability Among Young Women

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1965 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0002-922X
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.1965.02090030386004
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract EVER since the work of Gregg in 1941,1 physicians have become aware of the teratogenic effects of rubella contracted during the first trimester of pregnancy. Thus, an illness which previously had been considered a mild disease of childhood and adolescence became to be regarded as a serious problem. The availability of a method to determine immunity and an estimation of the risk of contracting rubella after exposure would be of great aid to physicians caring for the early pregnant woman when rubella is in the community. Recently, techniques have been developed which have made it possible to detect rubella virus and measure neutralizing antibody.2,3 Studies on experimental rubella have shown that human volunteers with preexisting neutralizing antibody were protected from subsequent viral challenge.4 The occurrence of a city-wide rubella epidemic in Cincinnati and an outbreak among personnel in the Children's Hospital outpatient clinic during the spring of References 1. Gregg, N.M.: Congenital Cataract Following German Measles in the Mother , Trans Opthal Soc Aust 3:35-46, 1941. 2. Parkman, P.D.; Buescher, E.L.; and Artenstein, M.S.: Recovery of Rubella Virus From Army Recruits , Proc Soc Exp Biol Med 111:225-230, 1962.Crossref 3. McCarthy, K.; Taylor-Robinson, C.H.; and Pellinger, S.E.: Isolation of Rubella Virus From Cases in Britain , Lancet 2:593-598, 1963.Crossref 4. Schiff, G.M.; Sever, J.L.; and Huebner, R.J.: Clinical and Laboratory Findings in Experimental Rubella , Arch Intern Med 116:537-543.Crossref 5. Schiff, G.M.; Sever, J.L.; and Huebner, R.J.: Rubella Virus: Neutralizing Antibody in Commercial Gamma Globulin , Science 142:58-60, 1963.Crossref 6. Sever, J.L.: Application of Microtechnique to Viral Serological Investigations , J Immun 88:320-329, 1962. 7. Sever, J.L.; Schiff, G.M.; and Huebner, R.J.: Frequency of Rubella Antibody Among Pregnant Women and Other Human and Animal Populations , Obstet Gynec 23:153-159, 1964. 8. Buescher, E.L., and Parkman, P.D.: Transmission of Rubella Virus in Military Populations, read before the 92nd meeting of the American Public Health Association, New York. Oct 7, 1964. 9. Schiff, G.M., and Dine, M.S.: Transmission of Rubella From Newborns , Amer J Dis Child , this issue, pp 447-451. 10. Schiff, G.M., et al: Studies on Congenital Rubella , Amer J Dis Child , this issue, pp 441-443.

Journal

American Journal of Diseases of ChildrenAmerican Medical Association

Published: Oct 1, 1965

References