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Rubella Retinitis

Rubella Retinitis Abstract THE OCCURRENCE of retinopathy in infants and children whose mothers had rubella in the first trimester of pregnancy was originally documented by Gregg in 1942 and Swan in 1943.1,2 While the entity of rubella retinopathy has been well described in the ophthalmologic literature, pediatricians are not generally aware of its existence. The disease consists of a pigment disturbance most often involving the posterior pole of the eye and most marked in the macula region. It may occur in one or both eyes and has been variously described as consisting of small, black, irregular masses varying in size,3 fine to gross pigmentary stippling with colloid changes and waxy disc,4 coarse mottling of the macula,1 and measly or blotchy changes.1 Morlet classifies three types of fundus changes: gross and generalized pigmentary changes; pepper-like pigmentary changes which are mainly peripheral; and strange, moth-eaten areas, some diffuse, others occurring References 1. Gregg, N.M.: Congenital Cataracts Following German Measles in Mothers , Trans Ophthal Soc Aus 3:35, 1942. 2. Swan, C., et al: Congenital Defects in Infants Following Infectious Diseases During Pregnancy , Med J Aust 11:201-210 ( (Sept 11) ) 1943. 3. Bourquin, J.B.: Les malformations du nouveau-ne causees par des viroses de la grossesse et plus particulierement par la rubeole, thesis, Geneva, 1948. 4. Hamilton, D., et al: Rubella Retinitis in Tasmania , Trans Ophthal Soc Aust 8:115, 1948. 5. Morlet, C.: Rubellar Retinitis in Western Australia , Trans Ophthal Soc Aust 9:212, 1949. 6. Plotkin, S.A., et al: Some Recently Recognized Manifestations of the Rubella Syndrome , J Pediat 67:182, ( (Aug) ) 1965.Crossref 7. Alford, C.A., et al: Virologic and Serologic Studies on Human Products of Conception After Maternal Rubella , New Eng J Med 271:1275 ( (Dec 17) ) 1964.Crossref 8. Krugman, S. (ed.): Rubella Symposium , Amer J Dis Child 110:345, 1965. 9. Marks, E.O.: Pigmentary Abnormality in Children Congenitally Deaf Following Maternal German Measles , Trans Ophthal Soc Aust 6:122, 1946. 10. Blankenstein, S.S., and Feiman, L.H.: Macular Pigmentation Following Maternal Rubella , Amer J Ophthal 35:408, 1952. 11. Naeye, R.L., and Blanc, W.: Pathogenesis of Congenital Rubella , JAMA 194:109 ( (Dec 20) ) 1965.Crossref 12. Lundstrom, R., and Bostrom, I.L.: Rubella in Pregnancy and the Incidence of Developmental Anomalies of the Eyes , Acta Ophthal 36:762, 1958. 13. Cordes, and Zetterstrom, B.: Congenital Rubella Retinitis: Eighteenth Congress of Internationale Ophthalmalia of Bruxelles , Excerpta Medica 12:C52, 1958. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Diseases of Children American Medical Association

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1967 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0002-922X
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.1967.02090180065003
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract THE OCCURRENCE of retinopathy in infants and children whose mothers had rubella in the first trimester of pregnancy was originally documented by Gregg in 1942 and Swan in 1943.1,2 While the entity of rubella retinopathy has been well described in the ophthalmologic literature, pediatricians are not generally aware of its existence. The disease consists of a pigment disturbance most often involving the posterior pole of the eye and most marked in the macula region. It may occur in one or both eyes and has been variously described as consisting of small, black, irregular masses varying in size,3 fine to gross pigmentary stippling with colloid changes and waxy disc,4 coarse mottling of the macula,1 and measly or blotchy changes.1 Morlet classifies three types of fundus changes: gross and generalized pigmentary changes; pepper-like pigmentary changes which are mainly peripheral; and strange, moth-eaten areas, some diffuse, others occurring References 1. Gregg, N.M.: Congenital Cataracts Following German Measles in Mothers , Trans Ophthal Soc Aus 3:35, 1942. 2. Swan, C., et al: Congenital Defects in Infants Following Infectious Diseases During Pregnancy , Med J Aust 11:201-210 ( (Sept 11) ) 1943. 3. Bourquin, J.B.: Les malformations du nouveau-ne causees par des viroses de la grossesse et plus particulierement par la rubeole, thesis, Geneva, 1948. 4. Hamilton, D., et al: Rubella Retinitis in Tasmania , Trans Ophthal Soc Aust 8:115, 1948. 5. Morlet, C.: Rubellar Retinitis in Western Australia , Trans Ophthal Soc Aust 9:212, 1949. 6. Plotkin, S.A., et al: Some Recently Recognized Manifestations of the Rubella Syndrome , J Pediat 67:182, ( (Aug) ) 1965.Crossref 7. Alford, C.A., et al: Virologic and Serologic Studies on Human Products of Conception After Maternal Rubella , New Eng J Med 271:1275 ( (Dec 17) ) 1964.Crossref 8. Krugman, S. (ed.): Rubella Symposium , Amer J Dis Child 110:345, 1965. 9. Marks, E.O.: Pigmentary Abnormality in Children Congenitally Deaf Following Maternal German Measles , Trans Ophthal Soc Aust 6:122, 1946. 10. Blankenstein, S.S., and Feiman, L.H.: Macular Pigmentation Following Maternal Rubella , Amer J Ophthal 35:408, 1952. 11. Naeye, R.L., and Blanc, W.: Pathogenesis of Congenital Rubella , JAMA 194:109 ( (Dec 20) ) 1965.Crossref 12. Lundstrom, R., and Bostrom, I.L.: Rubella in Pregnancy and the Incidence of Developmental Anomalies of the Eyes , Acta Ophthal 36:762, 1958. 13. Cordes, and Zetterstrom, B.: Congenital Rubella Retinitis: Eighteenth Congress of Internationale Ophthalmalia of Bruxelles , Excerpta Medica 12:C52, 1958.

Journal

American Journal of Diseases of ChildrenAmerican Medical Association

Published: Mar 1, 1967

References