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Routine Contraception

Routine Contraception To the Editor:— In Medical World News Aug. 26, 1960, is notice of a project of the Planned Parenthood Federation to use Enovid tablets as a "routinely" taken contraceptive. As former chief of the Municipal Premarital and Marital Guidance Clinic of Vienna (1921-1934), I take exception, not to the purpose, but, to this method of hormonal contraception. The persistent ingestion of progestin-like hormones works by suppression of ovulation. This might be harmless if used for a short while, but much caution should be taken if used for a long time. Most females in German concentration camps lost their menstrual periods, sometimes for years; usually immediately after their detainment, as a reaction to the fear caused by the Nazi terror.1 After their release from these camps most of the younger inmates started ovulating and menstruating again, and later became pregnant; but there was a startling after effect, as work by http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

Routine Contraception

JAMA , Volume 175 (8) – Feb 25, 1961

Routine Contraception

Abstract



To the Editor:—
In Medical World News Aug. 26, 1960, is notice of a project of the Planned Parenthood Federation to use Enovid tablets as a "routinely" taken contraceptive. As former chief of the Municipal Premarital and Marital Guidance Clinic of Vienna (1921-1934), I take exception, not to the purpose, but, to this method of hormonal contraception. The persistent ingestion of progestin-like hormones works by suppression of ovulation. This might...
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1961 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1961.03040080086030
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

To the Editor:— In Medical World News Aug. 26, 1960, is notice of a project of the Planned Parenthood Federation to use Enovid tablets as a "routinely" taken contraceptive. As former chief of the Municipal Premarital and Marital Guidance Clinic of Vienna (1921-1934), I take exception, not to the purpose, but, to this method of hormonal contraception. The persistent ingestion of progestin-like hormones works by suppression of ovulation. This might be harmless if used for a short while, but much caution should be taken if used for a long time. Most females in German concentration camps lost their menstrual periods, sometimes for years; usually immediately after their detainment, as a reaction to the fear caused by the Nazi terror.1 After their release from these camps most of the younger inmates started ovulating and menstruating again, and later became pregnant; but there was a startling after effect, as work by

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Feb 25, 1961

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