Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

ROSEOLA OF THE CONJUNCTIVA

ROSEOLA OF THE CONJUNCTIVA There is a type of conjunctivitis seen in exanthematous diseases such as measles, smallpox, typhus and scarlet fever, usually preceding the skin manifestation. The pathologic changes in this form of conjunctivitis are analogous to those in the eruption of the skin. It is in reality a form of hyperemic conjunctivitis with red blood cell diapedesis, wherein it varies, I believe, from the ordinary forms of conjunctivitis, in which the conjunctiva can be blanched by pressure or instillation of epinephrin. The conjunctivitis of the exanthematous type is characterized by its suddenness of onset, lack of discharge, some photophobia (not found in usual forms of conjunctivitis) and little or no lacrimation. The symptoms develop in a subacute or chronic manner, with an itching and sometimes burning sensation of the eyes. This disease picture is so common in early measles that further description is unnecessary. I have recently observed several cases of exanthematous http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

ROSEOLA OF THE CONJUNCTIVA

JAMA , Volume 84 (17) – Apr 25, 1925

Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-medical-association/roseola-of-the-conjunctiva-GAr40mKO8n
Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1925 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1925.02660430014005
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

There is a type of conjunctivitis seen in exanthematous diseases such as measles, smallpox, typhus and scarlet fever, usually preceding the skin manifestation. The pathologic changes in this form of conjunctivitis are analogous to those in the eruption of the skin. It is in reality a form of hyperemic conjunctivitis with red blood cell diapedesis, wherein it varies, I believe, from the ordinary forms of conjunctivitis, in which the conjunctiva can be blanched by pressure or instillation of epinephrin. The conjunctivitis of the exanthematous type is characterized by its suddenness of onset, lack of discharge, some photophobia (not found in usual forms of conjunctivitis) and little or no lacrimation. The symptoms develop in a subacute or chronic manner, with an itching and sometimes burning sensation of the eyes. This disease picture is so common in early measles that further description is unnecessary. I have recently observed several cases of exanthematous

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Apr 25, 1925

There are no references for this article.