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Rivaroxaban and Aspirin in Patients With Symptomatic Lower Extremity Peripheral Artery Disease

Rivaroxaban and Aspirin in Patients With Symptomatic Lower Extremity Peripheral Artery Disease Key PointsQuestionWhat features prognosticate vascular risk and response to low-dose rivaroxaban and aspirin treatment among patients with symptomatic lower extremity peripheral artery disease? FindingsIn this secondary analysis of a randomized clinical trial, the risk of major vascular events was greater than 10% over 30 months for patients with previous peripheral revascularization, previous amputation, or Fontaine III or IV symptoms and patients with comorbidities of kidney dysfunction, heart failure, diabetes, or polyvascular disease. These patients at high risk had an estimated 4.2% absolute risk reduction for major vascular events when treated with combination rivaroxaban and aspirin vs aspirin alone. MeaningPer this analysis, patients with high-risk lower extremity peripheral artery disease limb presentations or comorbidities, who are not at high bleeding risk, should be considered for treatment with combination rivaroxaban and aspirin. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA Cardiology American Medical Association

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2020 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
2380-6583
eISSN
2380-6591
DOI
10.1001/jamacardio.2020.4390
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Key PointsQuestionWhat features prognosticate vascular risk and response to low-dose rivaroxaban and aspirin treatment among patients with symptomatic lower extremity peripheral artery disease? FindingsIn this secondary analysis of a randomized clinical trial, the risk of major vascular events was greater than 10% over 30 months for patients with previous peripheral revascularization, previous amputation, or Fontaine III or IV symptoms and patients with comorbidities of kidney dysfunction, heart failure, diabetes, or polyvascular disease. These patients at high risk had an estimated 4.2% absolute risk reduction for major vascular events when treated with combination rivaroxaban and aspirin vs aspirin alone. MeaningPer this analysis, patients with high-risk lower extremity peripheral artery disease limb presentations or comorbidities, who are not at high bleeding risk, should be considered for treatment with combination rivaroxaban and aspirin.

Journal

JAMA CardiologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jan 30, 2021

References