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RHEUMATISM AND THE PREVENTION OF HEART COMPLICATIONS.

RHEUMATISM AND THE PREVENTION OF HEART COMPLICATIONS. More than fifteen years ago Eichhorst, of Zurich, in the third edition of his "Handbuch der Speciellen Pathologie und Therapie," transferred rheumatism from the class of constitutional to that of infectious diseases. In doing so he was only expressing a conviction that had been forming among clinicians generally. Because of certain superficial resemblances to gout, rheumatism had been classed among diathetic diseases, but without good reason, as time and closer clinical observation showed. Eichhorst's position was not unique, but it is only after fifteen years that the medical profession is coming to acknowledge its correctness. We have at length come to the point of conceding the infectious nature of rheumatism. The reasons given by Eichhorst before any germs had been described as occurring in the lesions of the disease are to-day the best arguments for its infectiousness. Rheumatism has all of the characteristics of an acute infectious fever—the incubation period, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

RHEUMATISM AND THE PREVENTION OF HEART COMPLICATIONS.

JAMA , Volume XXXV (24) – Dec 15, 1900

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1900 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1900.24620500021001d
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

More than fifteen years ago Eichhorst, of Zurich, in the third edition of his "Handbuch der Speciellen Pathologie und Therapie," transferred rheumatism from the class of constitutional to that of infectious diseases. In doing so he was only expressing a conviction that had been forming among clinicians generally. Because of certain superficial resemblances to gout, rheumatism had been classed among diathetic diseases, but without good reason, as time and closer clinical observation showed. Eichhorst's position was not unique, but it is only after fifteen years that the medical profession is coming to acknowledge its correctness. We have at length come to the point of conceding the infectious nature of rheumatism. The reasons given by Eichhorst before any germs had been described as occurring in the lesions of the disease are to-day the best arguments for its infectiousness. Rheumatism has all of the characteristics of an acute infectious fever—the incubation period,

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Dec 15, 1900

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