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Retrograde Intussusception After Total Gastrectomy: Report of a Case

Retrograde Intussusception After Total Gastrectomy: Report of a Case Abstract TOTAL gastrectomy has always been considered by surgeons to be a formidable procedure; this is justified by the operative mortality of 10%.1 Those patients who survive the operation, and remain well with respect to whatever necessitated the total gastrectomy initially, require adjustments in their way of life to meet a variety of functional and metabolic problems. Early complications of this procedure include bleeding from suture lines, stomal obstruction, small bowel volvulus, and loss of viability of the segment of jejunum used to restore intestinal continuity. The most common complication occurring early in the postoperative period is loss of integrity of the esophagointestinal anastomosis; this accounts for 50% of the fatal complications in the early postoperative period.1 Intussusception is a rare complication of gastrectomy. It may occur either in the immediate postoperative period or as late as 26 years after operation.2 The following report describes a patient in References 1. Fly, O.A., Jr., et al: Total Gastrectomy: Mortality and Survival , Ann Surg 147:760-768 ( (May) ) 1958.Crossref 2. Madding, G.F.; McLaughlin, B.F.; and De-Riemer, R.: Jejunojejunogastric Intussusception , Amer J Surg 92:636-639 ( (Oct) ) 1956.Crossref 3. Palmer, E.D.: Retrograde Intussusception at the Gastrojejunal Stoma: Two Cases and a Bibliography , Amer J Digest Dis 21:309-313 ( (Nov) ) 1954.Crossref 4. Caudell, W.S., and Lee, C.M., Jr.: Acute and Chronic Jejunogastric Intussusception , New Eng J Med 253:635-640 ( (Oct 13) ) 1955.Crossref 5. Conklin, E.F., and Markowitz, A.M.: Intussusception, a Complication of Gastric Surgery , Surgery 57:480-488 ( (March) ) 1965. 6. Davey, W.W.: Retrograde Intussusception Following Roux-Loop Anastomosis in Total Gastrectomy , Brit J Surg 42:102-103 ( (July) ) 1954.Crossref 7. Aleman, S.: Jejuno-gastric Intussusception: A Rare Complication of the Operated Stomach , Acta Radiol 29:383-395, 1948.Crossref 8. Lawson, E.H., and Whitener, D.L.: Retrograde Jejunogastric Intussusception , Arch Surg 60:242-246 ( (Feb) ) 1950.Crossref 9. Frederick, P.L., and Sizer, J.S.: Antegrade Jejuno-jejunal Intussusception: A Rare Complication Following Total Gastric Resection , Ann Surg 161:597-600 ( (April) ) 1965.Crossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Surgery American Medical Association

Retrograde Intussusception After Total Gastrectomy: Report of a Case

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1966 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0004-0010
eISSN
1538-3644
DOI
10.1001/archsurg.1966.01330040050008
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract TOTAL gastrectomy has always been considered by surgeons to be a formidable procedure; this is justified by the operative mortality of 10%.1 Those patients who survive the operation, and remain well with respect to whatever necessitated the total gastrectomy initially, require adjustments in their way of life to meet a variety of functional and metabolic problems. Early complications of this procedure include bleeding from suture lines, stomal obstruction, small bowel volvulus, and loss of viability of the segment of jejunum used to restore intestinal continuity. The most common complication occurring early in the postoperative period is loss of integrity of the esophagointestinal anastomosis; this accounts for 50% of the fatal complications in the early postoperative period.1 Intussusception is a rare complication of gastrectomy. It may occur either in the immediate postoperative period or as late as 26 years after operation.2 The following report describes a patient in References 1. Fly, O.A., Jr., et al: Total Gastrectomy: Mortality and Survival , Ann Surg 147:760-768 ( (May) ) 1958.Crossref 2. Madding, G.F.; McLaughlin, B.F.; and De-Riemer, R.: Jejunojejunogastric Intussusception , Amer J Surg 92:636-639 ( (Oct) ) 1956.Crossref 3. Palmer, E.D.: Retrograde Intussusception at the Gastrojejunal Stoma: Two Cases and a Bibliography , Amer J Digest Dis 21:309-313 ( (Nov) ) 1954.Crossref 4. Caudell, W.S., and Lee, C.M., Jr.: Acute and Chronic Jejunogastric Intussusception , New Eng J Med 253:635-640 ( (Oct 13) ) 1955.Crossref 5. Conklin, E.F., and Markowitz, A.M.: Intussusception, a Complication of Gastric Surgery , Surgery 57:480-488 ( (March) ) 1965. 6. Davey, W.W.: Retrograde Intussusception Following Roux-Loop Anastomosis in Total Gastrectomy , Brit J Surg 42:102-103 ( (July) ) 1954.Crossref 7. Aleman, S.: Jejuno-gastric Intussusception: A Rare Complication of the Operated Stomach , Acta Radiol 29:383-395, 1948.Crossref 8. Lawson, E.H., and Whitener, D.L.: Retrograde Jejunogastric Intussusception , Arch Surg 60:242-246 ( (Feb) ) 1950.Crossref 9. Frederick, P.L., and Sizer, J.S.: Antegrade Jejuno-jejunal Intussusception: A Rare Complication Following Total Gastric Resection , Ann Surg 161:597-600 ( (April) ) 1965.Crossref

Journal

Archives of SurgeryAmerican Medical Association

Published: Oct 1, 1966

References