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RESULTS WITH SALVARSAN IN HEREDITARY SYPHILIS

RESULTS WITH SALVARSAN IN HEREDITARY SYPHILIS During the period extending from November, 1911, to January, 1913, there were treated in the Babies' Hospital thirty-four cases of hereditary syphilis by salvarsan alone. In all this series of cases the injections were given intravenously at the bend of the elbow. The technic was as follows: General anesthesia; a careful dissection of the vein and injection through a fine glass cannula which was substituted for the needle. In other respects the procedure followed was that usually observed in salvarsan injections. This method of injection was found rather troublesome, tedious and somewhat difficult owing to the small size and fragile condition of the veins of these patients. The difficulties were, however, in a measure overcome with experience, and the time consumed in the operation was usually from fifteen to twenty minutes. In our later cases this method of injection was abandoned and the injections made with a needle directly into http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American journal of diseases of children American Medical Association

RESULTS WITH SALVARSAN IN HEREDITARY SYPHILIS

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1913 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0096-8994
eISSN
1538-3628
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.1913.04100330032005
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

During the period extending from November, 1911, to January, 1913, there were treated in the Babies' Hospital thirty-four cases of hereditary syphilis by salvarsan alone. In all this series of cases the injections were given intravenously at the bend of the elbow. The technic was as follows: General anesthesia; a careful dissection of the vein and injection through a fine glass cannula which was substituted for the needle. In other respects the procedure followed was that usually observed in salvarsan injections. This method of injection was found rather troublesome, tedious and somewhat difficult owing to the small size and fragile condition of the veins of these patients. The difficulties were, however, in a measure overcome with experience, and the time consumed in the operation was usually from fifteen to twenty minutes. In our later cases this method of injection was abandoned and the injections made with a needle directly into

Journal

American journal of diseases of childrenAmerican Medical Association

Published: Sep 1, 1913

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