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Response of the Food and Beverage Industry to the Obesity Threat

Response of the Food and Beverage Industry to the Obesity Threat COMMENTARY Response of the Food and Beverage Industry to the Obesity Threat Framing Issues Jeffrey P. Koplan, MD, MPH The food industry uses several practices to reframe issues, Kelly D. Brownell, PhD such as emphasizing “balance” and “calories out.” Compa- nies are in the “calories in” business and focusing on physical activity is increasingly seen as diverting attention O AVOID PUBLIC CRITICISM AND FORESTALL GOVERN- from food. A super-sized burger meal can contain more ment intervention, the food and beverage industry 1 than 2300 calories. The exercise equivalent of running a hopes that self-regulation is sufficient and also seeks marathon would be necessary to burn these calories. Tto establish public-private partnerships. This reac- Physical activity is beneficial for many health outcomes, tion is common in industries under threat and can take help- but even when practiced regularly, it cannot counteract ful or harmful forms. excessive caloric intake and allow time for work, sleep, Industry self-regulation can sometimes work in the pub- and other daily activities. lic interest, with forestry and fisheries serving as ex- 1,2 The industry argues that there are no bad foods and that amples. Public-private partnerships can also promote only the totality of the diet counts. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

Response of the Food and Beverage Industry to the Obesity Threat

JAMA , Volume 304 (13) – Oct 6, 2010

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2010 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.2010.1436
pmid
20924016
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

COMMENTARY Response of the Food and Beverage Industry to the Obesity Threat Framing Issues Jeffrey P. Koplan, MD, MPH The food industry uses several practices to reframe issues, Kelly D. Brownell, PhD such as emphasizing “balance” and “calories out.” Compa- nies are in the “calories in” business and focusing on physical activity is increasingly seen as diverting attention O AVOID PUBLIC CRITICISM AND FORESTALL GOVERN- from food. A super-sized burger meal can contain more ment intervention, the food and beverage industry 1 than 2300 calories. The exercise equivalent of running a hopes that self-regulation is sufficient and also seeks marathon would be necessary to burn these calories. Tto establish public-private partnerships. This reac- Physical activity is beneficial for many health outcomes, tion is common in industries under threat and can take help- but even when practiced regularly, it cannot counteract ful or harmful forms. excessive caloric intake and allow time for work, sleep, Industry self-regulation can sometimes work in the pub- and other daily activities. lic interest, with forestry and fisheries serving as ex- 1,2 The industry argues that there are no bad foods and that amples. Public-private partnerships can also promote only the totality of the diet counts.

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Oct 6, 2010

References