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Residential Segregation and Lung Cancer Mortality in the United States

Residential Segregation and Lung Cancer Mortality in the United States ORIGINAL ARTICLE Residential Segregation and Lung Cancer Mortality in the United States Awori J. Hayanga, MD, MPH; Steve B. Zeliadt, PhD; Leah M. Backhus, MD Objective: To examine the relationship between race The score ranges from 0 to 100 in increasing degrees of and lung cancer mortality and the effect of residential seg- residential segregation. regation in the United States. Results: The overall lung cancer mortality rate was higher Design: A retrospective, population-based study using for blacks than whites (58.9% vs 52.4% per 100 000 popu- data obtained from the 2009 Area Resource File and Sur- lation). Each additional level of segregation was associ- veillance, Epidemiology and End Results program. ated with a 0.5% increase in lung cancer mortality for blacks (P.001) and an associated decrease in mortality for whites Setting: Each county in the United States. (P=.002). Adjusted lung cancer mortality rates among blacks were 52.4% and 62.9% per 100 000 population in Patients: Black and white populations per US county. counties with the least (40% segregation) and the high- est levels of segregation (60% segregation), respec- Main Outcome Measures: A generalized linear tively. In contrast, the adjusted lung cancer mortality rates model with a Poisson distribution and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA Surgery American Medical Association

Residential Segregation and Lung Cancer Mortality in the United States

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2013 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
2168-6254
eISSN
2168-6262
DOI
10.1001/jamasurgery.2013.408
pmid
23324839
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ORIGINAL ARTICLE Residential Segregation and Lung Cancer Mortality in the United States Awori J. Hayanga, MD, MPH; Steve B. Zeliadt, PhD; Leah M. Backhus, MD Objective: To examine the relationship between race The score ranges from 0 to 100 in increasing degrees of and lung cancer mortality and the effect of residential seg- residential segregation. regation in the United States. Results: The overall lung cancer mortality rate was higher Design: A retrospective, population-based study using for blacks than whites (58.9% vs 52.4% per 100 000 popu- data obtained from the 2009 Area Resource File and Sur- lation). Each additional level of segregation was associ- veillance, Epidemiology and End Results program. ated with a 0.5% increase in lung cancer mortality for blacks (P.001) and an associated decrease in mortality for whites Setting: Each county in the United States. (P=.002). Adjusted lung cancer mortality rates among blacks were 52.4% and 62.9% per 100 000 population in Patients: Black and white populations per US county. counties with the least (40% segregation) and the high- est levels of segregation (60% segregation), respec- Main Outcome Measures: A generalized linear tively. In contrast, the adjusted lung cancer mortality rates model with a Poisson distribution and

Journal

JAMA SurgeryAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jan 1, 2013

References