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Residency Training in General Pediatrics: The Role of Federal Funding

Residency Training in General Pediatrics: The Role of Federal Funding Abstract The pediatrician's role as a generalist has been an important and controversial educational issue for the past two decades. Since the mid-1960s, a period of national emphasis on access to care for all people, the need for primary care physicians, and the recognition that general practitioners and subspecialists were being inequitably produced and distributed have been recognized. Subspecialists had increased dramatically in numbers along with the biomedical advances of the post–World War II period and the research-based economic interdependence between medical schools and the National Institutes of Health.1 During the last two decades, at least three major initiatives have been undertaken that are important to pediatric education. First, the federal government, through section 784 of the Public Health Service Act of 1976 (Title VII), provided support for residency training in general internal medicine and general pediatrics. Second, the pediatric residency requirements were modified in 1978 to encourage training programs References 1. Bergman A: Pediatric education for what? Pediatrics 1985;55:109. 2. Booklet of Information . Chapel Hill, NC, American Board of Pediatrics Inc, (Sept 1) , 1978. 3. American Academy of Pediatrics Task Force on Pediatric Education: The Future of Pediatric Education . Evanston, Ill, American Academy of Pediatrics, 1978. 4. Trent PJ, Hock RA, Yancy WS: Evaluation of behavioral and development training for pediatric residents . J Med Educ 1982;57:113-118. 5. Greenberg LW: Teaching primary care pediatrics to pediatric residents through an office rotation . J Med Educ 1974;54:340-342. 6. Eisenberg J: Curricula and organization of primary care residencies in internal medicine . J Med Educ 1980;55:345-353. 7. Weinberger HL, Oski F: A survey of pediatric residency training programs five years after the Task Force Report . Pediatrics 1984;74: 523-526. 8. 784 Resource Manual: General Internal Medicine and General Pediatrics Training Programs . Division of Medicine, Bureau of Health Professions, Health Resources and Services Administration, Rockville, Md, 1984. 9. Directory of Residency Training Programs . Chicago, American Medical Association, 1984. 10. National Advisory Committee: Graduate Education in Medicine: Summary Report to the Secretary , publication (HRA) 81-651. US Dept of Health and Human Services, Health Resources and Services Administration, 1980. 11. Shelov S, Alpert J, Strauss J, et al: The Impact of Primary Care Training Programs on Career Choices in Pediatrics . San Francisco, Ambulatory Pediatric Association, 1984. 12. Haggerty RJ: The Task Force Report . Pediatrics 1979;63:935-937. 13. Chilton LA: School health experience before and after completion of pediatric training . Pediatrics 1979;63:565-568. 14. Novak SF, Rockowitz RJ, Zastowny T: Evaluation of training in school health for pediatricians . J Med Educ 1978;53:837-840. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Diseases of Children American Medical Association

Residency Training in General Pediatrics: The Role of Federal Funding

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1987 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0002-922X
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.1987.04460070056023
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract The pediatrician's role as a generalist has been an important and controversial educational issue for the past two decades. Since the mid-1960s, a period of national emphasis on access to care for all people, the need for primary care physicians, and the recognition that general practitioners and subspecialists were being inequitably produced and distributed have been recognized. Subspecialists had increased dramatically in numbers along with the biomedical advances of the post–World War II period and the research-based economic interdependence between medical schools and the National Institutes of Health.1 During the last two decades, at least three major initiatives have been undertaken that are important to pediatric education. First, the federal government, through section 784 of the Public Health Service Act of 1976 (Title VII), provided support for residency training in general internal medicine and general pediatrics. Second, the pediatric residency requirements were modified in 1978 to encourage training programs References 1. Bergman A: Pediatric education for what? Pediatrics 1985;55:109. 2. Booklet of Information . Chapel Hill, NC, American Board of Pediatrics Inc, (Sept 1) , 1978. 3. American Academy of Pediatrics Task Force on Pediatric Education: The Future of Pediatric Education . Evanston, Ill, American Academy of Pediatrics, 1978. 4. Trent PJ, Hock RA, Yancy WS: Evaluation of behavioral and development training for pediatric residents . J Med Educ 1982;57:113-118. 5. Greenberg LW: Teaching primary care pediatrics to pediatric residents through an office rotation . J Med Educ 1974;54:340-342. 6. Eisenberg J: Curricula and organization of primary care residencies in internal medicine . J Med Educ 1980;55:345-353. 7. Weinberger HL, Oski F: A survey of pediatric residency training programs five years after the Task Force Report . Pediatrics 1984;74: 523-526. 8. 784 Resource Manual: General Internal Medicine and General Pediatrics Training Programs . Division of Medicine, Bureau of Health Professions, Health Resources and Services Administration, Rockville, Md, 1984. 9. Directory of Residency Training Programs . Chicago, American Medical Association, 1984. 10. National Advisory Committee: Graduate Education in Medicine: Summary Report to the Secretary , publication (HRA) 81-651. US Dept of Health and Human Services, Health Resources and Services Administration, 1980. 11. Shelov S, Alpert J, Strauss J, et al: The Impact of Primary Care Training Programs on Career Choices in Pediatrics . San Francisco, Ambulatory Pediatric Association, 1984. 12. Haggerty RJ: The Task Force Report . Pediatrics 1979;63:935-937. 13. Chilton LA: School health experience before and after completion of pediatric training . Pediatrics 1979;63:565-568. 14. Novak SF, Rockowitz RJ, Zastowny T: Evaluation of training in school health for pediatricians . J Med Educ 1978;53:837-840.

Journal

American Journal of Diseases of ChildrenAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jul 1, 1987

References

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