Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Rerouting the External Auditory Canal: A Method of Correcting Congenital Stenosis

Rerouting the External Auditory Canal: A Method of Correcting Congenital Stenosis Abstract An hourglass or funnel-shaped, stenosed, external auditory meatus with a normal tympanic membrane, middle and inner ear is one of the congenital anomalies that occasionally occurs. Such abnormality was present in both ears of a woman and caused chronic otitis externa and deafness. A routine meatoplasty on the right ear failed because of an unusual cephalad position of the drumhead in relation to a "downhill" position of the stenosed outer meatus. Rerouting the ear canal to a horizontal position by removing bone of the canal superiorly, posteriorly, and inferiorly, and grafting the now horizontal canal with skin taken from the postauricular fold produced a good result. This is a satisfactory procedure for a woman, but would be cosmetically unacceptable for a man. References 1. Fig 7.—Appearance of left ear seven weeks after surgery. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Otolaryngology American Medical Association

Rerouting the External Auditory Canal: A Method of Correcting Congenital Stenosis

Archives of Otolaryngology , Volume 101 (4) – Apr 1, 1975

Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-medical-association/rerouting-the-external-auditory-canal-a-method-of-correcting-wFEx5YHMbd
Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1975 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9977
DOI
10.1001/archotol.1975.00780330034009
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract An hourglass or funnel-shaped, stenosed, external auditory meatus with a normal tympanic membrane, middle and inner ear is one of the congenital anomalies that occasionally occurs. Such abnormality was present in both ears of a woman and caused chronic otitis externa and deafness. A routine meatoplasty on the right ear failed because of an unusual cephalad position of the drumhead in relation to a "downhill" position of the stenosed outer meatus. Rerouting the ear canal to a horizontal position by removing bone of the canal superiorly, posteriorly, and inferiorly, and grafting the now horizontal canal with skin taken from the postauricular fold produced a good result. This is a satisfactory procedure for a woman, but would be cosmetically unacceptable for a man. References 1. Fig 7.—Appearance of left ear seven weeks after surgery.

Journal

Archives of OtolaryngologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Apr 1, 1975

There are no references for this article.