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Report on Session I

Report on Session I Abstract Surgeon General Luther Terry, in his opening remarks, noted that in the past, and up to the present, every child was destined to contract measles and that the infection was frequently complicated and responsible for more deaths in the United States than any other acute infectious fever of childhood. He therefore looked forward to a valuable conference concerned primarily with the vaccine to prevent its occurrence. Dr. Wilson noted that measles was a disease recognized by Rhazes, the Arabian physician, as distinct from smallpox, a disease known to Shakespeare, and a truly universal disease prevalent in all continents and among all peoples; a disease which is always pandemic. Infection seems to have occurred entirely from case to case, and healthy carriers are unknown. Infection results in overt illness in nearly all the individuals, with an attack rate ranging from 85% in the population of the large cities to 100% in http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Diseases of Children American Medical Association

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1962 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0002-922X
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.1962.02080020291020
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Surgeon General Luther Terry, in his opening remarks, noted that in the past, and up to the present, every child was destined to contract measles and that the infection was frequently complicated and responsible for more deaths in the United States than any other acute infectious fever of childhood. He therefore looked forward to a valuable conference concerned primarily with the vaccine to prevent its occurrence. Dr. Wilson noted that measles was a disease recognized by Rhazes, the Arabian physician, as distinct from smallpox, a disease known to Shakespeare, and a truly universal disease prevalent in all continents and among all peoples; a disease which is always pandemic. Infection seems to have occurred entirely from case to case, and healthy carriers are unknown. Infection results in overt illness in nearly all the individuals, with an attack rate ranging from 85% in the population of the large cities to 100% in

Journal

American Journal of Diseases of ChildrenAmerican Medical Association

Published: Mar 1, 1962

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