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Removal of a Large Nasal Polyp: Report of a Case

Removal of a Large Nasal Polyp: Report of a Case Abstract NASAL polyps are comparatively common lesions, their exact nature and etiology under considerable dispute. Basically, it is generally conceded that the polyp is an inflammatory lesion, commonly resulting from an allergy of the nasal mucosa. The lesion is dependent on the local edema of the submucosa, with a chronic inflammatory cellular infiltration consisting chiefly of lymphocytes, large mononuclears, plasma cells, and, commonly, eosinophils in large numbers. The eosinophils are explained on the basis of allergy as one of the common cellular reactions seen in such allergic conditions as asthma, hay fever, and urticaria. Accumulation of fluid acts mechanically to cause the mucosa to become dependent, and gradually there develops a pedunculated mass of loose, edematous, submucous connective tissue covered by a somewhat thickenned inflammatory mucosa. This, in turn, frequently undergoes ulceration with secondary infection and other evidence of inflammatory change, with leukocytic infiltration, and may arise in either the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Otolaryngology American Medical Association

Removal of a Large Nasal Polyp: Report of a Case

Archives of Otolaryngology , Volume 83 (3) – Mar 1, 1966

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1966 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9977
DOI
10.1001/archotol.1966.00760020250013
Publisher site
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Abstract

Abstract NASAL polyps are comparatively common lesions, their exact nature and etiology under considerable dispute. Basically, it is generally conceded that the polyp is an inflammatory lesion, commonly resulting from an allergy of the nasal mucosa. The lesion is dependent on the local edema of the submucosa, with a chronic inflammatory cellular infiltration consisting chiefly of lymphocytes, large mononuclears, plasma cells, and, commonly, eosinophils in large numbers. The eosinophils are explained on the basis of allergy as one of the common cellular reactions seen in such allergic conditions as asthma, hay fever, and urticaria. Accumulation of fluid acts mechanically to cause the mucosa to become dependent, and gradually there develops a pedunculated mass of loose, edematous, submucous connective tissue covered by a somewhat thickenned inflammatory mucosa. This, in turn, frequently undergoes ulceration with secondary infection and other evidence of inflammatory change, with leukocytic infiltration, and may arise in either the

Journal

Archives of OtolaryngologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Mar 1, 1966

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