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Remembering Louis Tribondeau (1872-1918)

Remembering Louis Tribondeau (1872-1918) French physician Louis Tribondeau (1872-1918) has been an important name in biochemical and dermatological research for 100 years. His study of infectious diseases, particularly syphilis and mycoses, marks some important chapters in the history of dermatology. Most notably, he ameliorated the Wassermann reaction and described a method for staining Treponema pallidum and other spirochetes by silver impregnation using ammoniacal silver nitrate solution, named “Fontana-Tribondeau silver stain.”1-3 However, despite his excellent contributions, he has largely been ignored by published literature. This is also the case in Corfu, Greece, where he served as chief medical officer of the Navy and as head of the department of bacteriology and infectious diseases for about 1 year until his death in the 1918 influenza pandemic. The hospital he worked in had been named the “Achilleion Tribondeau Hospital,” as seen on the left pillar plate of the Achilleion Palace (Figure). This commemorative plaque lies today hidden and forgotten behind tree branches. Figure. Pillar Plate for Achilleion Tribondeau Hospital, Corfu, Greece View LargeDownload The left pillar plate in the Achilleion Palace, Corfu, Greece, stating “Achilleion Tribondeau Hospital.” (Photograph courtesy of Maria Dalamaga, MD, PhD; August 2012.) Back to top Article Information Corresponding Author: Antonis A. Kousoulis, MD, University of Athens Medical School, 9 Huxley Gardens, NW10 7EB, London, England (antonis.kousoulis@sni.gr). References 1. Kasai K, Kobayashi R. The stomach spirochete occurring in mammals. J Parasitol. 1919;6(1):1-10.Google ScholarCrossref 2. Gerstley L III, Morton HE. The demonstration of bacterial capsules by Fontana’s staining procedure. J Bacteriol. 1954;67(1):125-126.PubMedGoogle Scholar 3. Fonseca L, de Toledo BE, Orrico SR, Elias AM, Ito IY. Determination of the presence of spirochetes in the subgingival plaque of Brazilian children. Braz Dent J. 1993;4(1):3-8.PubMedGoogle Scholar http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA Dermatology American Medical Association

Remembering Louis Tribondeau (1872-1918)

JAMA Dermatology , Volume 149 (8) – Aug 1, 2013

Remembering Louis Tribondeau (1872-1918)

Abstract

French physician Louis Tribondeau (1872-1918) has been an important name in biochemical and dermatological research for 100 years. His study of infectious diseases, particularly syphilis and mycoses, marks some important chapters in the history of dermatology. Most notably, he ameliorated the Wassermann reaction and described a method for staining Treponema pallidum and other spirochetes by silver impregnation using ammoniacal silver nitrate solution, named “Fontana-Tribondeau silver...
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 2013 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
2168-6068
eISSN
2168-6084
DOI
10.1001/jamadermatol.2013.4236
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

French physician Louis Tribondeau (1872-1918) has been an important name in biochemical and dermatological research for 100 years. His study of infectious diseases, particularly syphilis and mycoses, marks some important chapters in the history of dermatology. Most notably, he ameliorated the Wassermann reaction and described a method for staining Treponema pallidum and other spirochetes by silver impregnation using ammoniacal silver nitrate solution, named “Fontana-Tribondeau silver stain.”1-3 However, despite his excellent contributions, he has largely been ignored by published literature. This is also the case in Corfu, Greece, where he served as chief medical officer of the Navy and as head of the department of bacteriology and infectious diseases for about 1 year until his death in the 1918 influenza pandemic. The hospital he worked in had been named the “Achilleion Tribondeau Hospital,” as seen on the left pillar plate of the Achilleion Palace (Figure). This commemorative plaque lies today hidden and forgotten behind tree branches. Figure. Pillar Plate for Achilleion Tribondeau Hospital, Corfu, Greece View LargeDownload The left pillar plate in the Achilleion Palace, Corfu, Greece, stating “Achilleion Tribondeau Hospital.” (Photograph courtesy of Maria Dalamaga, MD, PhD; August 2012.) Back to top Article Information Corresponding Author: Antonis A. Kousoulis, MD, University of Athens Medical School, 9 Huxley Gardens, NW10 7EB, London, England (antonis.kousoulis@sni.gr). References 1. Kasai K, Kobayashi R. The stomach spirochete occurring in mammals. J Parasitol. 1919;6(1):1-10.Google ScholarCrossref 2. Gerstley L III, Morton HE. The demonstration of bacterial capsules by Fontana’s staining procedure. J Bacteriol. 1954;67(1):125-126.PubMedGoogle Scholar 3. Fonseca L, de Toledo BE, Orrico SR, Elias AM, Ito IY. Determination of the presence of spirochetes in the subgingival plaque of Brazilian children. Braz Dent J. 1993;4(1):3-8.PubMedGoogle Scholar

Journal

JAMA DermatologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Aug 1, 2013

Keywords: mycoses,syphilis,communicable diseases,greece,silver nitrate,silver staining,influenza,silver,treponema pallidum,spirochaetales,trees (plant),bacteriology,dermatology,pandemics

References