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Regional Myocardial Infarction at Operation: An Automated System of Identification

Regional Myocardial Infarction at Operation: An Automated System of Identification Abstract • The difference between normal and infarcted myocardium at operation cannot always be detected by inspection or palpation. Infarcted myocardium may be identified by a decrease in the amplitude of the ventricular bipolar electrogram. Although this method is reliable and reproducible, it requires a second observer's visual analysis and interpretation of the electrogram signal. This method is therefore subject to the vagaries of human observation, analysis, and accounts of rapidly changing data. We have designed and built an automated instrument to simplify the recognition of transmural infarction. (Arch Surg 110:1416-1418, 1975) References 1. Kaiser GA, Waldo AL, Harris PD, et al: New method to delineate myocardial damage at surgery . Circulation 39 ( (suppl) ):83-89, 1969.Crossref 2. Kaiser GA, Waldo AL, Bowman FD Jr, et al: The use of ventricular electrograms in operation for coronary artery disease and its complications . Ann Thorac Surg 10:153-162, 1970.Crossref 3. Siegel L, Mahoney EB, Manning JA, et al: An audible alarm system to facilitate the intraoperative identification of cardiac conduction tissue . J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg 68:241-247, 1974. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Surgery American Medical Association

Regional Myocardial Infarction at Operation: An Automated System of Identification

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1975 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0004-0010
eISSN
1538-3644
DOI
10.1001/archsurg.1975.01360170156024
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract • The difference between normal and infarcted myocardium at operation cannot always be detected by inspection or palpation. Infarcted myocardium may be identified by a decrease in the amplitude of the ventricular bipolar electrogram. Although this method is reliable and reproducible, it requires a second observer's visual analysis and interpretation of the electrogram signal. This method is therefore subject to the vagaries of human observation, analysis, and accounts of rapidly changing data. We have designed and built an automated instrument to simplify the recognition of transmural infarction. (Arch Surg 110:1416-1418, 1975) References 1. Kaiser GA, Waldo AL, Harris PD, et al: New method to delineate myocardial damage at surgery . Circulation 39 ( (suppl) ):83-89, 1969.Crossref 2. Kaiser GA, Waldo AL, Bowman FD Jr, et al: The use of ventricular electrograms in operation for coronary artery disease and its complications . Ann Thorac Surg 10:153-162, 1970.Crossref 3. Siegel L, Mahoney EB, Manning JA, et al: An audible alarm system to facilitate the intraoperative identification of cardiac conduction tissue . J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg 68:241-247, 1974.

Journal

Archives of SurgeryAmerican Medical Association

Published: Nov 1, 1975

References