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Regional Dermatology: A System of Diagnosis

Regional Dermatology: A System of Diagnosis This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables. Abstract Regionally speaking, this book stands dermatologic teaching on its ear. Despite the author's assertion that "basically, all skin diseases look alike," lesional morphology is recognized as the foundation of clinical diagnosis; distribution can only serve as an ancillary (and often misleading) bit of information. Though one might appreciate the utility of atlases devoted to structurally or functionally distinctive anatomic areas, basing a system of diagnosis primarily on distribution is quixotic if not perverse. Epistemology aside, the book is flawed in most other respects. The clinical descriptions are perfunctory. The selection of diseases is idiosyncratic. (Why are xeroderma pigmentosa discussed in four separate sections but leukocytoclastic vasculitis not mentioned once?) There are so many factual errors that reading the text becomes a test of one's credulity. (Erythrasma is not fungal, lymphogranuloma venereum is not viral, nor does a scabetic infection confer immunity.) The therapeutic recommendations are atavistic. The black and white http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Dermatology American Medical Association

Regional Dermatology: A System of Diagnosis

Archives of Dermatology , Volume 121 (5) – May 1, 1985

Regional Dermatology: A System of Diagnosis

Abstract

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables. Abstract Regionally speaking, this book stands dermatologic teaching on its ear. Despite the author's assertion that "basically, all skin diseases look alike," lesional morphology is recognized as the foundation of clinical diagnosis; distribution can only serve as an ancillary (and often misleading) bit of information. Though one might...
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1985 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-987X
eISSN
1538-3652
DOI
10.1001/archderm.1985.01660050132035
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables. Abstract Regionally speaking, this book stands dermatologic teaching on its ear. Despite the author's assertion that "basically, all skin diseases look alike," lesional morphology is recognized as the foundation of clinical diagnosis; distribution can only serve as an ancillary (and often misleading) bit of information. Though one might appreciate the utility of atlases devoted to structurally or functionally distinctive anatomic areas, basing a system of diagnosis primarily on distribution is quixotic if not perverse. Epistemology aside, the book is flawed in most other respects. The clinical descriptions are perfunctory. The selection of diseases is idiosyncratic. (Why are xeroderma pigmentosa discussed in four separate sections but leukocytoclastic vasculitis not mentioned once?) There are so many factual errors that reading the text becomes a test of one's credulity. (Erythrasma is not fungal, lymphogranuloma venereum is not viral, nor does a scabetic infection confer immunity.) The therapeutic recommendations are atavistic. The black and white

Journal

Archives of DermatologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: May 1, 1985

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