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Regional Brain Abnormalities Associated With Long-term Heavy Cannabis Use

Regional Brain Abnormalities Associated With Long-term Heavy Cannabis Use ORIGINAL ARTICLE Regional Brain Abnormalities Associated With Long-term Heavy Cannabis Use Murat Yu¨cel, PhD, MAPS; Nadia Solowij, PhD; Colleen Respondek, BSc; Sarah Whittle, PhD; Alex Fornito, PhD; Christos Pantelis, MD, MRCPsych, FRANZCP; Dan I. Lubman, MB ChB, PhD, FRANZCP Context: Cannabis is the most widely used illicit drug sures of cannabis use. Subthreshold psychotic symp- in the developed world. Despite this, there is a paucity toms and verbal learning ability were also measured. of research examining its long-term effect on the hu- man brain. Results: Cannabis users had bilaterally reduced hippo- campal and amygdala volumes (P = .001), with a rela- Objective: To determine whether long-term heavy can- tively (and significantly [P = .02]) greater magnitude of nabis use is associated with gross anatomical abnormali- reduction in the former (12.0% vs 7.1%). Left hemi- ties in 2 cannabinoid receptor–rich regions of the brain, sphere hippocampal volume was inversely associated with the hippocampus and the amygdala. cumulative exposure to cannabis during the previous 10 years (P = .01) and subthreshold positive psychotic symp- Design: Cross-sectional design using high-resolution toms (P .001). Positive symptom scores were also as- (3-T) structural magnetic resonance imaging. sociated with cumulative exposure to cannabis (P = http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA Psychiatry American Medical Association

Regional Brain Abnormalities Associated With Long-term Heavy Cannabis Use

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2008 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
2168-622X
eISSN
2168-6238
DOI
10.1001/archpsyc.65.6.694
pmid
18519827
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ORIGINAL ARTICLE Regional Brain Abnormalities Associated With Long-term Heavy Cannabis Use Murat Yu¨cel, PhD, MAPS; Nadia Solowij, PhD; Colleen Respondek, BSc; Sarah Whittle, PhD; Alex Fornito, PhD; Christos Pantelis, MD, MRCPsych, FRANZCP; Dan I. Lubman, MB ChB, PhD, FRANZCP Context: Cannabis is the most widely used illicit drug sures of cannabis use. Subthreshold psychotic symp- in the developed world. Despite this, there is a paucity toms and verbal learning ability were also measured. of research examining its long-term effect on the hu- man brain. Results: Cannabis users had bilaterally reduced hippo- campal and amygdala volumes (P = .001), with a rela- Objective: To determine whether long-term heavy can- tively (and significantly [P = .02]) greater magnitude of nabis use is associated with gross anatomical abnormali- reduction in the former (12.0% vs 7.1%). Left hemi- ties in 2 cannabinoid receptor–rich regions of the brain, sphere hippocampal volume was inversely associated with the hippocampus and the amygdala. cumulative exposure to cannabis during the previous 10 years (P = .01) and subthreshold positive psychotic symp- Design: Cross-sectional design using high-resolution toms (P .001). Positive symptom scores were also as- (3-T) structural magnetic resonance imaging. sociated with cumulative exposure to cannabis (P =

Journal

JAMA PsychiatryAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jun 1, 2008

References