Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Redundancy of the Skin of the Neck as a Sign of Congenital Hypothyroidism

Redundancy of the Skin of the Neck as a Sign of Congenital Hypothyroidism Abstract Sir.—Redundancy of the skin of the neck is found in various chromosomal and nonchromosomal syndromes.1,2 We recently saw a newborn male infant with redundant skin of the neck in whom primary hypothyroidism was diagnosed on routine newborn blood screening. Primary hypothyroidism has not, to our knowledge, been previously associated with this physical finding. Patient Report.—A 3425-g male infant, the product of a 42-week gestation, was born to a 30-year-old mother. Pregnancy was unremarkable, and the mother denied use of alcohol, drugs, or tobacco. Labor was complicated by fetal bradycardia, and delivery was performed using low forceps. Apgar scores were 9 at one minute and 10 at five minutes. Physical examination at birth revealed a head circumference of 35.5 cm, a length of 50 cm, and a weight of 3425 g (all 50% of normal). The hair was coarse, and the head was of normal shape, with normal References 1. Shapiro LR, Hsu LYF, Hirschhorn K: Extra posterior cervical skin: A possible sign of chromosomal aberration in infancy . J Pediatr 1970; 77:690-691.Crossref 2. Smith DW: Recognizable Patterns of Human Malformation , ed 3. Philadelphia, WB Saunders Co, 1982. 3. Collins E, Turner G: The Noonan syndrome: A review of the clinical and genetic features of 27 cases . J Pediatr 1973;83:941-950.Crossref 4. Nora JJ, Nora AH, Sinha AK, et al: The Ullrich-Noonan syndrome (Turner phenotype) . AJDC 1974;127:48-55. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Diseases of Children American Medical Association

Redundancy of the Skin of the Neck as a Sign of Congenital Hypothyroidism

Redundancy of the Skin of the Neck as a Sign of Congenital Hypothyroidism

Abstract

Abstract Sir.—Redundancy of the skin of the neck is found in various chromosomal and nonchromosomal syndromes.1,2 We recently saw a newborn male infant with redundant skin of the neck in whom primary hypothyroidism was diagnosed on routine newborn blood screening. Primary hypothyroidism has not, to our knowledge, been previously associated with this physical finding. Patient Report.—A 3425-g male infant, the product of a 42-week gestation, was born to a 30-year-old mother....
Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-medical-association/redundancy-of-the-skin-of-the-neck-as-a-sign-of-congenital-NgjqGFJ596
Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1987 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0002-922X
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.1987.04460050019011
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Sir.—Redundancy of the skin of the neck is found in various chromosomal and nonchromosomal syndromes.1,2 We recently saw a newborn male infant with redundant skin of the neck in whom primary hypothyroidism was diagnosed on routine newborn blood screening. Primary hypothyroidism has not, to our knowledge, been previously associated with this physical finding. Patient Report.—A 3425-g male infant, the product of a 42-week gestation, was born to a 30-year-old mother. Pregnancy was unremarkable, and the mother denied use of alcohol, drugs, or tobacco. Labor was complicated by fetal bradycardia, and delivery was performed using low forceps. Apgar scores were 9 at one minute and 10 at five minutes. Physical examination at birth revealed a head circumference of 35.5 cm, a length of 50 cm, and a weight of 3425 g (all 50% of normal). The hair was coarse, and the head was of normal shape, with normal References 1. Shapiro LR, Hsu LYF, Hirschhorn K: Extra posterior cervical skin: A possible sign of chromosomal aberration in infancy . J Pediatr 1970; 77:690-691.Crossref 2. Smith DW: Recognizable Patterns of Human Malformation , ed 3. Philadelphia, WB Saunders Co, 1982. 3. Collins E, Turner G: The Noonan syndrome: A review of the clinical and genetic features of 27 cases . J Pediatr 1973;83:941-950.Crossref 4. Nora JJ, Nora AH, Sinha AK, et al: The Ullrich-Noonan syndrome (Turner phenotype) . AJDC 1974;127:48-55.

Journal

American Journal of Diseases of ChildrenAmerican Medical Association

Published: May 1, 1987

References