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Reducing the Stress on Clinicians Working in the ICU

Reducing the Stress on Clinicians Working in the ICU Opinion EDITORIAL Jennifer B. Seaman, PhD, RN; Taya R. Cohen, PhD; Douglas B. White, MD, MAS It is important to reduce the stress of clinicians working in the The trial has several strengths. First, the investigators se- intensive care unit (ICU). For instance, an estimated 39% of ICU lected as the primary outcome measure a well-validated in- nurses exhibit symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder, the strument with established benchmarks for the general nurs- ing population. Second, the secondary outcomes included prevalence of clinical depression among nurses is twice the na- tional average, and many re- objective measures such as absenteeism and job turnover, port symptoms consistent which showed similarly beneficial effects compared with the Related article page 1988 1,2 with burnout. This prob- nurse-reported primary outcome. Third, the study had excel- lem is not limited to nurses; physicians, medical trainees, and lent retention and there were relatively few missing data. others who work in the ICU environment experience similar The study also has several limitations. First, the trial was levels of psychological distress. conducted in a single country and it is not clear whether these These problems adversely affect the well-being of indi- effects will generalize to other countries http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

Reducing the Stress on Clinicians Working in the ICU

JAMA , Volume 320 (19) – Nov 20, 2018

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2018 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.2018.14285
pmid
30357376
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Opinion EDITORIAL Jennifer B. Seaman, PhD, RN; Taya R. Cohen, PhD; Douglas B. White, MD, MAS It is important to reduce the stress of clinicians working in the The trial has several strengths. First, the investigators se- intensive care unit (ICU). For instance, an estimated 39% of ICU lected as the primary outcome measure a well-validated in- nurses exhibit symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder, the strument with established benchmarks for the general nurs- ing population. Second, the secondary outcomes included prevalence of clinical depression among nurses is twice the na- tional average, and many re- objective measures such as absenteeism and job turnover, port symptoms consistent which showed similarly beneficial effects compared with the Related article page 1988 1,2 with burnout. This prob- nurse-reported primary outcome. Third, the study had excel- lem is not limited to nurses; physicians, medical trainees, and lent retention and there were relatively few missing data. others who work in the ICU environment experience similar The study also has several limitations. First, the trial was levels of psychological distress. conducted in a single country and it is not clear whether these These problems adversely affect the well-being of indi- effects will generalize to other countries

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Nov 20, 2018

References