Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You and Your Team.

Learn More →

Reduced Infant Lung Function, Active Smoking, and Wheeze in 18-Year-Old Individuals

Reduced Infant Lung Function, Active Smoking, and Wheeze in 18-Year-Old Individuals ARTICLE Reduced Infant Lung Function, Active Smoking, and Wheeze in 18-Year-Old Individuals David Mullane, MD; Steve W. Turner, MD; Des W. Cox, MD; Jack Goldblatt, MD; Lou I. Landau, MD; Peter N. le Soue ¨f, MD Importance: This is the first study to link reduced lung cent wheeze. Compared with the no-wheeze group (n=96), function in early life, before the development of symp- persistent wheeze (n=13) was independently associated toms, to wheeze in 18-year-olds. Additionally, the study with reduced percentage of predicted V'maxFRC (mean gives insight into factors other than reduced lung func- reduction, 43%; 95% CI, 13-74). Compared with the no- tion that are also associated with persistent wheeze in wheeze group, persistent wheeze was also associated with young adults. atopy in infancy (odds ratio=7.1; 95% CI, 1.5-34.5), ma- ternal asthma (odds ratio=6.8; 95% CI, 1.4-32.3), and ac- Objective: To test the hypothesis that reduced lung func- tive smoking (odds ratio=4.8; 95% CI, 1.0-21.3). When tion in early life is associated with increased risk for per- only wheeze at age 18 years was considered, reduced per- sistent wheeze at age 18 years. centage of predicted V'maxFRC was associated with wheeze at age 18 years only among current smokers http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA Pediatrics American Medical Association

Reduced Infant Lung Function, Active Smoking, and Wheeze in 18-Year-Old Individuals

Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-medical-association/reduced-infant-lung-function-active-smoking-and-wheeze-in-18-year-old-hzouC0RDv3
Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2013 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
2168-6203
eISSN
2168-6211
DOI
10.1001/jamapediatrics.2013.633
pmid
23420147
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ARTICLE Reduced Infant Lung Function, Active Smoking, and Wheeze in 18-Year-Old Individuals David Mullane, MD; Steve W. Turner, MD; Des W. Cox, MD; Jack Goldblatt, MD; Lou I. Landau, MD; Peter N. le Soue ¨f, MD Importance: This is the first study to link reduced lung cent wheeze. Compared with the no-wheeze group (n=96), function in early life, before the development of symp- persistent wheeze (n=13) was independently associated toms, to wheeze in 18-year-olds. Additionally, the study with reduced percentage of predicted V'maxFRC (mean gives insight into factors other than reduced lung func- reduction, 43%; 95% CI, 13-74). Compared with the no- tion that are also associated with persistent wheeze in wheeze group, persistent wheeze was also associated with young adults. atopy in infancy (odds ratio=7.1; 95% CI, 1.5-34.5), ma- ternal asthma (odds ratio=6.8; 95% CI, 1.4-32.3), and ac- Objective: To test the hypothesis that reduced lung func- tive smoking (odds ratio=4.8; 95% CI, 1.0-21.3). When tion in early life is associated with increased risk for per- only wheeze at age 18 years was considered, reduced per- sistent wheeze at age 18 years. centage of predicted V'maxFRC was associated with wheeze at age 18 years only among current smokers

Journal

JAMA PediatricsAmerican Medical Association

Published: Apr 1, 2013

References