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Red Wine Fatigue

Red Wine Fatigue Abstract A recent suggestion that red wine may reduce the risk of coronary artery disease1 has prompted many to change their drinking habits. The hopes for benefits do not, however, come without risks. I have noted an increasing number of individuals who present with complaints of facial pressure and unexplained fatigue that resolve with the elimination of red wine. Of 297 consecutive patients, questioned prospectively, from my practice of general internal medicine, 28% (study group) noted fatigue and facial pressure the day after drinking red wine in moderation. The duration of symptoms was variable, but a number experienced persistent daily fatigue with the moderate use of red wine that entirely resolved with abstention from this form of alcohol. When the study group was compared with the remainder of the population (control), they were more likely to have a history of sinusitis (38% vs 17%; P<.001), pollen allergy (59% vs References 1. Renaud S, de Lorgeril M. Wine, alcohol, platelets, and the French paradox for coronary heart disease . Lancet . 1992;339:1523-1526.Crossref 2. Jarman J, Glover V, Sandler M. Release of (14C) 5-hydroxytryptamine from human platelets by red wine . Life Sci . 1991;48:2297-3000.Crossref 3. Littlewood JT, Gibb C, Glover V, Sandler M, Davies PT, Rose FC. Red wine as a cause of migraine . Lancet . 1988;1:558-559.Crossref 4. Singleton VL, Noble AC. Wine flavor and phenolic substances . Am Chem Soc Symp . 1976;26:47-70. 5. Goldman JL. Vasomotor rhinitis and sinusitis . In: Goldman JL, Blaugrund SM, Shugar JM, eds. The Principles and Practice of Rhinology: A Text on the Diseases and Surgery of the Nose and Paranasal Sinuses . New York, NY: John Wiley & Sons; 1987:235-248. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Internal Medicine American Medical Association

Red Wine Fatigue

Abstract

Abstract A recent suggestion that red wine may reduce the risk of coronary artery disease1 has prompted many to change their drinking habits. The hopes for benefits do not, however, come without risks. I have noted an increasing number of individuals who present with complaints of facial pressure and unexplained fatigue that resolve with the elimination of red wine. Of 297 consecutive patients, questioned prospectively, from my practice of general internal medicine, 28% (study group) noted...
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1994 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9926
eISSN
1538-3679
DOI
10.1001/archinte.1994.00420100150020
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract A recent suggestion that red wine may reduce the risk of coronary artery disease1 has prompted many to change their drinking habits. The hopes for benefits do not, however, come without risks. I have noted an increasing number of individuals who present with complaints of facial pressure and unexplained fatigue that resolve with the elimination of red wine. Of 297 consecutive patients, questioned prospectively, from my practice of general internal medicine, 28% (study group) noted fatigue and facial pressure the day after drinking red wine in moderation. The duration of symptoms was variable, but a number experienced persistent daily fatigue with the moderate use of red wine that entirely resolved with abstention from this form of alcohol. When the study group was compared with the remainder of the population (control), they were more likely to have a history of sinusitis (38% vs 17%; P<.001), pollen allergy (59% vs References 1. Renaud S, de Lorgeril M. Wine, alcohol, platelets, and the French paradox for coronary heart disease . Lancet . 1992;339:1523-1526.Crossref 2. Jarman J, Glover V, Sandler M. Release of (14C) 5-hydroxytryptamine from human platelets by red wine . Life Sci . 1991;48:2297-3000.Crossref 3. Littlewood JT, Gibb C, Glover V, Sandler M, Davies PT, Rose FC. Red wine as a cause of migraine . Lancet . 1988;1:558-559.Crossref 4. Singleton VL, Noble AC. Wine flavor and phenolic substances . Am Chem Soc Symp . 1976;26:47-70. 5. Goldman JL. Vasomotor rhinitis and sinusitis . In: Goldman JL, Blaugrund SM, Shugar JM, eds. The Principles and Practice of Rhinology: A Text on the Diseases and Surgery of the Nose and Paranasal Sinuses . New York, NY: John Wiley & Sons; 1987:235-248.

Journal

Archives of Internal MedicineAmerican Medical Association

Published: May 23, 1994

References