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Recurrent Cellulitis After Coronary Bypass Surgery

Recurrent Cellulitis After Coronary Bypass Surgery Certain patients who have undergone coronary artery bypass grafts suffer from episodes of acute cellulitis, often repeatedly, in the saphenous vein donor extremity. We describe nine patients with this entity, five of whom suffered recurrent attacks (range, two to >20). The mean interval between surgery and the initial bout of cellulitis was 15 months (range, two to 46 months). A characteristic clinical syndrome was present in the majority of patients that included the abrupt onset of chills, followed by fever (generally >38.8 °C), prostration, and obvious cellulitis. Seven patients also suffered from tinea pedis; in two instances, measures to control the dermatophytosis were instituted and attacks ceased. The pathogenesis of the entity may involve complex interactions between fungal and bacterial agents. Factors such as direct bacterial infection, hypersensitivity to streptococcal exotoxins, and id reactions to dermatophytes are probably involved in varying combinations. (JAMA 1984;251:1049-1052) http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

Recurrent Cellulitis After Coronary Bypass Surgery

JAMA , Volume 251 (8) – Feb 24, 1984

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1984 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1984.03340320035023
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Certain patients who have undergone coronary artery bypass grafts suffer from episodes of acute cellulitis, often repeatedly, in the saphenous vein donor extremity. We describe nine patients with this entity, five of whom suffered recurrent attacks (range, two to >20). The mean interval between surgery and the initial bout of cellulitis was 15 months (range, two to 46 months). A characteristic clinical syndrome was present in the majority of patients that included the abrupt onset of chills, followed by fever (generally >38.8 °C), prostration, and obvious cellulitis. Seven patients also suffered from tinea pedis; in two instances, measures to control the dermatophytosis were instituted and attacks ceased. The pathogenesis of the entity may involve complex interactions between fungal and bacterial agents. Factors such as direct bacterial infection, hypersensitivity to streptococcal exotoxins, and id reactions to dermatophytes are probably involved in varying combinations. (JAMA 1984;251:1049-1052)

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Feb 24, 1984

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