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Recovery From Encephalomyelitis Caused by Herpesvirus simiae: Report of a Case

Recovery From Encephalomyelitis Caused by Herpesvirus simiae: Report of a Case Abstract Since the original description of herpesvirus B encephalomyelitis by Sabin and Wright,1 survival has been reported in but four patients— three recovered2-4 and one died after 40 months in coma.5 We wish to record a fourth recovery. Our patient is additionally remarkable because he has no apparent residual neurological defects, except for diminished visual acuity of the left eye. Herpesvirus simiae (HVS), a "B" virus or herpes B, is a natural parasite of Asian monkeys of the genus Macaca.6,7 It is closely related to Herpesvirus hominis (HVH), which infects man.8,9 The diagnosis of HVS infections in humans is accomplished readily in fatal cases because the virus can be recovered from brain tissue and identified in neutralization tests with antiserum to a known strain of HVS. Diagnosis prior to death, or in nonfatal cases, is more complicated, but B virus infection should be suspected in patients References 1. Sabin AB, Wright AM: Acute ascending myelitis following a monkey bite, with the isolation of a virus capable of reproducing the disease. J Exp Med 59:115-136, 1934.Crossref 2. Davidson WL, Hummeler K: B virus infection in man. Ann NY Acad Sci 85:970-979, 1960.Crossref 3. Breen GE, Lamb SG, Otaki AT: Monkey bite encephalomyelitis: Report of a case—with recovery. Br Med J 2:22-23, 1958.Crossref 4. Fierer J, Baceley P, Braude AI: Herpes B virus encephalomyelitis presenting as ophthalmic zoster. Ann Intern Med 79:225-228, 1973.Crossref 5. Hull RN, The simian herpesviruses , in Kaplan AS (ed): The Herpesviruses . New York, Academic Press, Inc, 1973. 6. Hull RN: The simian viruses. Virol Monogr 2:22-25, 1968. 7. Hunt RD, Melendez LV: Herpes virus infections of nonhuman primates: A review. Lab Anim Care 19:221-234, 1969. 8. Sabin AB: Studies on the B virus: I. The immunological identity of a virus isolated from a human case of ascending myelitis associated with visceral necrosis. Br J Exp Pathol 15:248-268, 1934. 9. Burnet FM, Lush D, Jackson AV: The relationship of the herpes and B viruses: Immunological and epidemiological consideration. Aust J Exp Biol 17:41-51, 1939.Crossref 10. Cabasso VJ, Chapell WA, Avampato JE, et al: Correlation of B virus and herpes simplex virus antibodies in human sera. J Lab Clin Med 70:170-178, 1967. 11. Watson DH, Widly P, Harvey BAM, et al: Serological relationships among viruses of the herpes group. J Genet Virol 1:139-141, 1967.Crossref 12. Espana C: Herpesvirus simiae infection in Macaca radiata. Am J Phys Anthrop 38:447-454, 1973.Crossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Internal Medicine American Medical Association

Recovery From Encephalomyelitis Caused by Herpesvirus simiae: Report of a Case

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1975 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9926
eISSN
1538-3679
DOI
10.1001/archinte.1975.00330060112017
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Since the original description of herpesvirus B encephalomyelitis by Sabin and Wright,1 survival has been reported in but four patients— three recovered2-4 and one died after 40 months in coma.5 We wish to record a fourth recovery. Our patient is additionally remarkable because he has no apparent residual neurological defects, except for diminished visual acuity of the left eye. Herpesvirus simiae (HVS), a "B" virus or herpes B, is a natural parasite of Asian monkeys of the genus Macaca.6,7 It is closely related to Herpesvirus hominis (HVH), which infects man.8,9 The diagnosis of HVS infections in humans is accomplished readily in fatal cases because the virus can be recovered from brain tissue and identified in neutralization tests with antiserum to a known strain of HVS. Diagnosis prior to death, or in nonfatal cases, is more complicated, but B virus infection should be suspected in patients References 1. Sabin AB, Wright AM: Acute ascending myelitis following a monkey bite, with the isolation of a virus capable of reproducing the disease. J Exp Med 59:115-136, 1934.Crossref 2. Davidson WL, Hummeler K: B virus infection in man. Ann NY Acad Sci 85:970-979, 1960.Crossref 3. Breen GE, Lamb SG, Otaki AT: Monkey bite encephalomyelitis: Report of a case—with recovery. Br Med J 2:22-23, 1958.Crossref 4. Fierer J, Baceley P, Braude AI: Herpes B virus encephalomyelitis presenting as ophthalmic zoster. Ann Intern Med 79:225-228, 1973.Crossref 5. Hull RN, The simian herpesviruses , in Kaplan AS (ed): The Herpesviruses . New York, Academic Press, Inc, 1973. 6. Hull RN: The simian viruses. Virol Monogr 2:22-25, 1968. 7. Hunt RD, Melendez LV: Herpes virus infections of nonhuman primates: A review. Lab Anim Care 19:221-234, 1969. 8. Sabin AB: Studies on the B virus: I. The immunological identity of a virus isolated from a human case of ascending myelitis associated with visceral necrosis. Br J Exp Pathol 15:248-268, 1934. 9. Burnet FM, Lush D, Jackson AV: The relationship of the herpes and B viruses: Immunological and epidemiological consideration. Aust J Exp Biol 17:41-51, 1939.Crossref 10. Cabasso VJ, Chapell WA, Avampato JE, et al: Correlation of B virus and herpes simplex virus antibodies in human sera. J Lab Clin Med 70:170-178, 1967. 11. Watson DH, Widly P, Harvey BAM, et al: Serological relationships among viruses of the herpes group. J Genet Virol 1:139-141, 1967.Crossref 12. Espana C: Herpesvirus simiae infection in Macaca radiata. Am J Phys Anthrop 38:447-454, 1973.Crossref

Journal

Archives of Internal MedicineAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jun 1, 1975

References