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Recent Progress in Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s Diseases

Recent Progress in Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s Diseases edited by Israel Hanin, PhD, Ramon Cacabelos, MD, PhD, DMSci, and Abraham Fisher, PhD, 383 pp, with illus, $139.95, ISBN 1-84184-320-2, London, England, Taylor & Francis Group, 2005. This book is a compilation of the proceedings of a meeting on the title subject, held in Seville, Spain, in May 2003. Fittingly, it opens with a stunning photo of Queen Sophia of Spain, who was the honorary president of this meeting and supported it generously. The editors dedicate the book to her. A total of 46 presentations are gathered into 46 book chapters. Each includes from 2 to 12 pages of text and a list of references, with as few as 13 and as many as 100 references. Despite the large number of authors, the prose is remarkably clear as a result of the editorial work. The type is large and the spacing open, making the text very readable. The book opens with 11 pages listing the affiliations of each of the 167 contributing authors. Most of the first 10 chapters deal with basic and clinical aspects of Parkinson disease and other movement disorders. Chapter 7, however, discusses insulinlike growth factor I in aging and dementia. Most of the other 36 chapters are dedicated to the molecular aspects that underlie Alzheimer disease, the fronto-temporal dementias, and to conclude, there is a chapter on human prion diseases. Similar to chapter 7 in the section on Parkinson disease, chapter 17 is also an odd man out because it deals with brain inflammation and psychogeriatric diseases, mainly post-mortem inflammatory markers in patients with delirium. Its placement is questionable because of the following chapter that it introduces—a cogent account of the role of inflammation in Alzheimer disease. Other than this general schema, the book lacks clear organization of the various presentations. Tau disorders are discussed in chapters 12, 23, 27, 38, 41, and 43. Kurt Jellinger, MD, describes the clinical and neuropathological classification of the tauopathies in chapter 41, a seemingly good introduction to the topic. Long before that is chapter 27, describing the lack of effect of certoparin in an experimental tauopathy. There is some consistency in placing therapeutic strategies before disease mechanisms. Chapters 39, 44, and 45, among others, stress the role of β-amyloid in abnormal τ phosphorylation and neurotoxicity. Chapters 36 and 37 describe some strategies to slow the abnormal accumulation of β-amyloid in the brain. This book provides an excellent reference documenting some of the work being performed in the laboratories of the presenting authors up until 2003. Because many of the authors are leading researchers on neurodegeneration, the book will be particularly interesting for those wishing to peruse a portion of the field. Some notable clinical and research aspects on these diseases are missing. For instance, there is nothing on deep brain stimulation for Parkinson disease or on immune therapies for Alzheimer disease. These proceedings are definitely not meant to be a resource for someone looking for an introduction or a comprehensive review of these 2 diseases. Prose ★★★★ Illustrations ★★★ Science ★★★ Usefulness ★★ Back to top Article Information Correspondence: Dr Masdeu, Neurological Sciences, University of Navarra, Center for Applied Medical Research, Avenida Pio XII 36, 31008 Pamplona, Spain (masdeu@unav.es). http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Neurology American Medical Association

Recent Progress in Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s Diseases

Archives of Neurology , Volume 63 (1) – Jan 1, 2006

Recent Progress in Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s Diseases

Abstract

edited by Israel Hanin, PhD, Ramon Cacabelos, MD, PhD, DMSci, and Abraham Fisher, PhD, 383 pp, with illus, $139.95, ISBN 1-84184-320-2, London, England, Taylor & Francis Group, 2005. This book is a compilation of the proceedings of a meeting on the title subject, held in Seville, Spain, in May 2003. Fittingly, it opens with a stunning photo of Queen Sophia of Spain, who was the honorary president of this meeting and supported it generously. The editors dedicate the book to her. A total of...
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9942
eISSN
1538-3687
DOI
10.1001/archneur.63.1.152-a
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

edited by Israel Hanin, PhD, Ramon Cacabelos, MD, PhD, DMSci, and Abraham Fisher, PhD, 383 pp, with illus, $139.95, ISBN 1-84184-320-2, London, England, Taylor & Francis Group, 2005. This book is a compilation of the proceedings of a meeting on the title subject, held in Seville, Spain, in May 2003. Fittingly, it opens with a stunning photo of Queen Sophia of Spain, who was the honorary president of this meeting and supported it generously. The editors dedicate the book to her. A total of 46 presentations are gathered into 46 book chapters. Each includes from 2 to 12 pages of text and a list of references, with as few as 13 and as many as 100 references. Despite the large number of authors, the prose is remarkably clear as a result of the editorial work. The type is large and the spacing open, making the text very readable. The book opens with 11 pages listing the affiliations of each of the 167 contributing authors. Most of the first 10 chapters deal with basic and clinical aspects of Parkinson disease and other movement disorders. Chapter 7, however, discusses insulinlike growth factor I in aging and dementia. Most of the other 36 chapters are dedicated to the molecular aspects that underlie Alzheimer disease, the fronto-temporal dementias, and to conclude, there is a chapter on human prion diseases. Similar to chapter 7 in the section on Parkinson disease, chapter 17 is also an odd man out because it deals with brain inflammation and psychogeriatric diseases, mainly post-mortem inflammatory markers in patients with delirium. Its placement is questionable because of the following chapter that it introduces—a cogent account of the role of inflammation in Alzheimer disease. Other than this general schema, the book lacks clear organization of the various presentations. Tau disorders are discussed in chapters 12, 23, 27, 38, 41, and 43. Kurt Jellinger, MD, describes the clinical and neuropathological classification of the tauopathies in chapter 41, a seemingly good introduction to the topic. Long before that is chapter 27, describing the lack of effect of certoparin in an experimental tauopathy. There is some consistency in placing therapeutic strategies before disease mechanisms. Chapters 39, 44, and 45, among others, stress the role of β-amyloid in abnormal τ phosphorylation and neurotoxicity. Chapters 36 and 37 describe some strategies to slow the abnormal accumulation of β-amyloid in the brain. This book provides an excellent reference documenting some of the work being performed in the laboratories of the presenting authors up until 2003. Because many of the authors are leading researchers on neurodegeneration, the book will be particularly interesting for those wishing to peruse a portion of the field. Some notable clinical and research aspects on these diseases are missing. For instance, there is nothing on deep brain stimulation for Parkinson disease or on immune therapies for Alzheimer disease. These proceedings are definitely not meant to be a resource for someone looking for an introduction or a comprehensive review of these 2 diseases. Prose ★★★★ Illustrations ★★★ Science ★★★ Usefulness ★★ Back to top Article Information Correspondence: Dr Masdeu, Neurological Sciences, University of Navarra, Center for Applied Medical Research, Avenida Pio XII 36, 31008 Pamplona, Spain (masdeu@unav.es).

Journal

Archives of NeurologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jan 1, 2006

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