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Reappraising Medical Syntax—Does Race Belong in the First Line of the Patient History?

Reappraising Medical Syntax—Does Race Belong in the First Line of the Patient History? Letters Editor's Note alizable to other hospitals or health systems. Moreover, the au- Reappraising Medical Syntax—Does Race Belong thors did not investigate clinical outcomes associated with in the First Line of the Patient History? differential documentation of race. The findings, however, raise In the midst of the resurgent movement for racial justice, the question of whether basic medical practices, such as how physicians and health care institutions should carefully look patients are characterized in the first line of the HPI, invite ste- within for potential sources of racial and ethnic health dis- reotypes and bias into clinical judgment. The rote documen- parities. In this issue of JAMA Internal Medicine, Balderston tation of race in the first line of the HPI is unlikely to serve a et al report on differential documentation of race in the first useful function, and the practice of differential documenta- line of the history of present illness (HPI). In 1200 admis- tion offers potential for harm. Given the important implica- sions to an academic medical center in Richmond, Virginia, tions related to the experience of structural racism, we sug- 33% of Black patients had their race documented in the first gest that race should be http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA Internal Medicine American Medical Association

Reappraising Medical Syntax—Does Race Belong in the First Line of the Patient History?

Reappraising Medical Syntax—Does Race Belong in the First Line of the Patient History?

Abstract

Letters Editor's Note alizable to other hospitals or health systems. Moreover, the au- Reappraising Medical Syntax—Does Race Belong thors did not investigate clinical outcomes associated with in the First Line of the Patient History? differential documentation of race. The findings, however, raise In the midst of the resurgent movement for racial justice, the question of whether basic medical practices, such as how physicians and health care institutions should carefully look...
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2021 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
2168-6106
eISSN
2168-6114
DOI
10.1001/jamainternmed.2020.5789
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Letters Editor's Note alizable to other hospitals or health systems. Moreover, the au- Reappraising Medical Syntax—Does Race Belong thors did not investigate clinical outcomes associated with in the First Line of the Patient History? differential documentation of race. The findings, however, raise In the midst of the resurgent movement for racial justice, the question of whether basic medical practices, such as how physicians and health care institutions should carefully look patients are characterized in the first line of the HPI, invite ste- within for potential sources of racial and ethnic health dis- reotypes and bias into clinical judgment. The rote documen- parities. In this issue of JAMA Internal Medicine, Balderston tation of race in the first line of the HPI is unlikely to serve a et al report on differential documentation of race in the first useful function, and the practice of differential documenta- line of the history of present illness (HPI). In 1200 admis- tion offers potential for harm. Given the important implica- sions to an academic medical center in Richmond, Virginia, tions related to the experience of structural racism, we sug- 33% of Black patients had their race documented in the first gest that race should be

Journal

JAMA Internal MedicineAmerican Medical Association

Published: Mar 11, 2021

References

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