Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You and Your Team.

Learn More →

REACTIONS TO AN INFLUENZA VIRUS VACCINE IN INFANTS AND CHILDREN

REACTIONS TO AN INFLUENZA VIRUS VACCINE IN INFANTS AND CHILDREN A RECENT report from this laboratory indicated that maximum antibody response in infants and children is not always achieved with a single injection of influenza virus vaccine.1 In the course of that study reactions to the injected material were noted, and it seemed advisable to report, in some detail, the ill effects encountered. It was readily apparent that the number of reactions was proportional to the amount of virus in the vaccine2 and that the severity of the reactions was also related to the virus content. Furthermore, the frequency and severity appeared to be more pronounced than experience with adult groups had demonstrated. These observations, as well as some discussion of dosage of influenza virus vaccines, comprise the bulk of the report. The study was conducted with three groups of approximately 30 children each, whose average age was 3.2 years. The type A PR8 strain of influenza virus http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American journal of diseases of children American Medical Association

REACTIONS TO AN INFLUENZA VIRUS VACCINE IN INFANTS AND CHILDREN

Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-medical-association/reactions-to-an-influenza-virus-vaccine-in-infants-and-children-o3b5TZaIny
Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1949 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0096-8994
eISSN
1538-3628
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.1949.02030050308001
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

A RECENT report from this laboratory indicated that maximum antibody response in infants and children is not always achieved with a single injection of influenza virus vaccine.1 In the course of that study reactions to the injected material were noted, and it seemed advisable to report, in some detail, the ill effects encountered. It was readily apparent that the number of reactions was proportional to the amount of virus in the vaccine2 and that the severity of the reactions was also related to the virus content. Furthermore, the frequency and severity appeared to be more pronounced than experience with adult groups had demonstrated. These observations, as well as some discussion of dosage of influenza virus vaccines, comprise the bulk of the report. The study was conducted with three groups of approximately 30 children each, whose average age was 3.2 years. The type A PR8 strain of influenza virus

Journal

American journal of diseases of childrenAmerican Medical Association

Published: Sep 1, 1949

There are no references for this article.