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RAEDER'S SYNDROME

RAEDER'S SYNDROME Abstract GEORGE Raeder,1 a Norwegian neurologist, in 1918 first described a disturbance of the oculopupillary fibers associated with an incomplete Horner syndrome. The patient had headache, vomiting, pain in the left trigeminal area, paresis of the left side of the palate, and ptosis, miosis, and hypotonia, on the left, without vasomotor or trophic disturbances. The patient died of pulmonary tuberculosis, and necropsy revealed a tumor, described as an endothelioma, between the internal carotid artery and the Gasserian ganglion. The cervical sympathetic trunk was carefully examined down to the third thoracic segment without any lesion being found. This case was of extreme interest, since it presented a sympathetic syndrome quite distinct in anatomical localization from the ordinary sympathetic syndrome produced by spinal lesions or lesions of the cervical sympathetic fibers. Raeder suggested, therefore, that lesions of the sympathetic fibers be classified as follows: In 1924 Raeder reported four more cases of References 1. Raeder, G.: Et tilfalde av intrakraniel sympaticuslammelse , Norsk mag. lægevidensk. 79:999-1015 ( (Sept.) ) 1918. 2. Raeder, J. G.: "Paratrigeminal" Paralysis of Oculo-Pupillary Sympathetic , Brain 47:149-158 ( (May) ) 1924.Crossref 3. Sales, M.: Raeder Paratrigeminal Syndrome (Horner Syndrome with Paralysis of the Sixth Cranial Nerves and Neuralgia of Ophthalmic Branch): Report of Case , Arq. Inst. Penido Burnier 5:231-237 ( (Dec.) ) 1939. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png A.M.A. Archives of Ophthalmology American Medical Association

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1952 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0096-6339
DOI
10.1001/archopht.1952.00920010631009
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract GEORGE Raeder,1 a Norwegian neurologist, in 1918 first described a disturbance of the oculopupillary fibers associated with an incomplete Horner syndrome. The patient had headache, vomiting, pain in the left trigeminal area, paresis of the left side of the palate, and ptosis, miosis, and hypotonia, on the left, without vasomotor or trophic disturbances. The patient died of pulmonary tuberculosis, and necropsy revealed a tumor, described as an endothelioma, between the internal carotid artery and the Gasserian ganglion. The cervical sympathetic trunk was carefully examined down to the third thoracic segment without any lesion being found. This case was of extreme interest, since it presented a sympathetic syndrome quite distinct in anatomical localization from the ordinary sympathetic syndrome produced by spinal lesions or lesions of the cervical sympathetic fibers. Raeder suggested, therefore, that lesions of the sympathetic fibers be classified as follows: In 1924 Raeder reported four more cases of References 1. Raeder, G.: Et tilfalde av intrakraniel sympaticuslammelse , Norsk mag. lægevidensk. 79:999-1015 ( (Sept.) ) 1918. 2. Raeder, J. G.: "Paratrigeminal" Paralysis of Oculo-Pupillary Sympathetic , Brain 47:149-158 ( (May) ) 1924.Crossref 3. Sales, M.: Raeder Paratrigeminal Syndrome (Horner Syndrome with Paralysis of the Sixth Cranial Nerves and Neuralgia of Ophthalmic Branch): Report of Case , Arq. Inst. Penido Burnier 5:231-237 ( (Dec.) ) 1939.

Journal

A.M.A. Archives of OphthalmologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Nov 1, 1952

References

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