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Radiological Cases of the Month

Radiological Cases of the Month Abstract This 11-month-old girl was seen because of persistent wheezing. Laboratory evaluation included determination of white blood cell count, and hemoglobin and electrolyte levels. All results were normal. Chest roentgenograms were obtained (Figs 1 and 2), as was a barium esophagogram (Fig 3). Pertinent medical history included multiple clinical episodes of wheezing and stridor, which was present since birth. Growth and development were normal. Denouement and Discussion Pulmonary Sling Anomaly of the Left Pulmonary Artery Pulmonary sling anomaly of the left pulmonary artery is a condition in which the left pulmonary artery originates from the right pulmonary artery. It is an uncommon congenital anomaly of the pulmonary arteries and may produce severe airway obstruction. The usual origin of the left pulmonary artery from the main pulmonary artery trunk is not demonstrated. The left pulmonary artery, arising from the distal right pulmonary artery, supplies the entire left lung. The embryology of this condition results from a defect of the left sixth aortic arch (from which the pulmonary arteries arise) such that the left lung is supplied y a collateral branch of the right pulmonary artery. This ollateral left branch courses to the left side behind the trachea and anterior to the esophagus at or slightly above he level of the carina. The compression from this vessel may cause airway obstruction affecting the right lung, the lower trachea, and/or the left main-stem bronchus. References 1. Marrow WR. Arch and pulmonary artery anomalies . In: Oski FA, D'Anglis CD, Feign RD, Warshow JB, eds. Principles and Practice of Pediatrics . Philadelphia, Pa: JB Lippincott; 1990:1450-1451. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Diseases of Children American Medical Association

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1993 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0002-922X
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.1993.02160300091031
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract This 11-month-old girl was seen because of persistent wheezing. Laboratory evaluation included determination of white blood cell count, and hemoglobin and electrolyte levels. All results were normal. Chest roentgenograms were obtained (Figs 1 and 2), as was a barium esophagogram (Fig 3). Pertinent medical history included multiple clinical episodes of wheezing and stridor, which was present since birth. Growth and development were normal. Denouement and Discussion Pulmonary Sling Anomaly of the Left Pulmonary Artery Pulmonary sling anomaly of the left pulmonary artery is a condition in which the left pulmonary artery originates from the right pulmonary artery. It is an uncommon congenital anomaly of the pulmonary arteries and may produce severe airway obstruction. The usual origin of the left pulmonary artery from the main pulmonary artery trunk is not demonstrated. The left pulmonary artery, arising from the distal right pulmonary artery, supplies the entire left lung. The embryology of this condition results from a defect of the left sixth aortic arch (from which the pulmonary arteries arise) such that the left lung is supplied y a collateral branch of the right pulmonary artery. This ollateral left branch courses to the left side behind the trachea and anterior to the esophagus at or slightly above he level of the carina. The compression from this vessel may cause airway obstruction affecting the right lung, the lower trachea, and/or the left main-stem bronchus. References 1. Marrow WR. Arch and pulmonary artery anomalies . In: Oski FA, D'Anglis CD, Feign RD, Warshow JB, eds. Principles and Practice of Pediatrics . Philadelphia, Pa: JB Lippincott; 1990:1450-1451.

Journal

American Journal of Diseases of ChildrenAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jun 1, 1993

References