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Radiological Cases of the Month

Radiological Cases of the Month Abstract An 11-month-old boy came to medical attention after a heart murmur was detected during a routine physical examination. He was referred to our institution for evaluation of abnormal chest roentgenographic findings (Fig 1). The pregnancy and perinatal course were normal and the patient had no history of cyanosis or serious childhood illness. At presentation the boy had developed normally and was active and acyanotic. A ventilation-perfusion scan (Fig 2) and a right ventriculogram (Fig 3) were obtained. The Editors welcome contributions to Picture of the Month and Radiological Case of the Month. Those who wish to contribute should send their manuscripts to Dr Feingold (Picture of the Month), National Birth Defects Center, Franciscan Children's Hospital, 30 Warren St, Brighton, MA 02135, or Dr Wood (Radiological Case of the Month), Department of Radiology, Childrens Hospital of Los Angeles, 4650 Sunset Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90027. Articles and photographs accepted for publication References 1. Pool PE, Vogel JHK, Blount SG Jr. Congenital unilateral absence of a pulmonary artery: the importance of flow in pulmonary hypertension . Am JCardiol . 1962;10:706-732.Crossref 2. Sherrick DW, Kincaid OW, DuShane JW. Agenesis of a main branch of the pulmonary artery . AJR . 1962;87:917-928. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Diseases of Children American Medical Association

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1990 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0002-922X
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.1990.02150270089031
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract An 11-month-old boy came to medical attention after a heart murmur was detected during a routine physical examination. He was referred to our institution for evaluation of abnormal chest roentgenographic findings (Fig 1). The pregnancy and perinatal course were normal and the patient had no history of cyanosis or serious childhood illness. At presentation the boy had developed normally and was active and acyanotic. A ventilation-perfusion scan (Fig 2) and a right ventriculogram (Fig 3) were obtained. The Editors welcome contributions to Picture of the Month and Radiological Case of the Month. Those who wish to contribute should send their manuscripts to Dr Feingold (Picture of the Month), National Birth Defects Center, Franciscan Children's Hospital, 30 Warren St, Brighton, MA 02135, or Dr Wood (Radiological Case of the Month), Department of Radiology, Childrens Hospital of Los Angeles, 4650 Sunset Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90027. Articles and photographs accepted for publication References 1. Pool PE, Vogel JHK, Blount SG Jr. Congenital unilateral absence of a pulmonary artery: the importance of flow in pulmonary hypertension . Am JCardiol . 1962;10:706-732.Crossref 2. Sherrick DW, Kincaid OW, DuShane JW. Agenesis of a main branch of the pulmonary artery . AJR . 1962;87:917-928.

Journal

American Journal of Diseases of ChildrenAmerican Medical Association

Published: Mar 1, 1990

References