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RADIOACTIVE STRONTIUM THERAPY OF THE EYE: Corneal Biostandardization and Evaluation of an Applicator for Use in Ophthalmology

RADIOACTIVE STRONTIUM THERAPY OF THE EYE: Corneal Biostandardization and Evaluation of an... Abstract BETA irradiation of the eye remains relatively unemployed because of inconvenience, practical difficulties, and, in some instances, potential radiation hazard to the operator or to the patient's lens, or occasionally to both; but, because this form of superficial radiation therapy is both safe and effective when used properly in the conditions for which it is indicated and since it has no therapeutic equivalent in some instances, the continuing search for an improved ophthalmic applicator has led to the use of artificially radioactive isotopes. Radioactive strontium (Sr90) was chosen for the source material by Friedell and his associates,1 who were the first to use this fission product in an applicator for ophthalmic use. Following the lead of this laboratory model, commercial physicists recently developed a clinical model, the RA-1 Medical Applicator.2 The effects of clinical treatments with new applicators of this type are certain to be somewhat unpredictable References 1. Friedell, H. L.; Thomas, C. I., and Krohmer, J. S.: Beta-Ray Application to the Eye, with Description of Applicator Utilizing SR90 and Its Clinical Use , Am. J. Ophth. 33:525-533 ( (April) ) 1950. 2. Manufactured by Tracerlab, Boston. 3. Applicator 153 was made available for this study through the cooperation of Dr. L. L. Garner, Milwaukee. 4. Tracerlab, Inc.: Instruction Manual Pertaining to the Use of the RA-1 Medical Applicator, Serial No. 29, 1951. 5. Friedell, Thomas, and Krohmer.1 Tracerlab, Inc.4 6. Wilson, F. M.: Beta Irradiation: Evaluation of Radium-D Applicator for Ophthalmic Use , Am. J. Ophth. 33:539-548 ( (April) ) 1950. 7. Hughes, W. F., Jr., and Iliff, C. E.: Effects of Beta Irradiation on the Rabbit's Eye , Am. J. Roentgenol. 56:502-512 ( (Oct.) ) 1946. 8. Kahn, M.: Unpublished data from the University of Illinois College of Medicine; cited by Hughes, W. F. Jr.: Beta Radiation Therapy in Ophthalmology, to be published. 9. (b) Hughes, W. F., Jr.: Beta Radiation Therapy in Ophthalmology, to be published. 10. Stevenson, W.: An Ophthalmic Applicator for Beta Radium-D , Mississippi Valley M. J. 70:242 ( (Nov.) ) 1948. 11. Wilson, F. M.: Applicators for Beta Irradiation of the Eye , Am. J. Ophth. 35:645-656 ( (May) ) 1952. 12. These values are for the applicators used in this study only, and do not necessarily apply to other, similar applicators. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png A.M.A. Archives of Ophthalmology American Medical Association

RADIOACTIVE STRONTIUM THERAPY OF THE EYE: Corneal Biostandardization and Evaluation of an Applicator for Use in Ophthalmology

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1952 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0096-6339
DOI
10.1001/archopht.1952.00920010698003
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract BETA irradiation of the eye remains relatively unemployed because of inconvenience, practical difficulties, and, in some instances, potential radiation hazard to the operator or to the patient's lens, or occasionally to both; but, because this form of superficial radiation therapy is both safe and effective when used properly in the conditions for which it is indicated and since it has no therapeutic equivalent in some instances, the continuing search for an improved ophthalmic applicator has led to the use of artificially radioactive isotopes. Radioactive strontium (Sr90) was chosen for the source material by Friedell and his associates,1 who were the first to use this fission product in an applicator for ophthalmic use. Following the lead of this laboratory model, commercial physicists recently developed a clinical model, the RA-1 Medical Applicator.2 The effects of clinical treatments with new applicators of this type are certain to be somewhat unpredictable References 1. Friedell, H. L.; Thomas, C. I., and Krohmer, J. S.: Beta-Ray Application to the Eye, with Description of Applicator Utilizing SR90 and Its Clinical Use , Am. J. Ophth. 33:525-533 ( (April) ) 1950. 2. Manufactured by Tracerlab, Boston. 3. Applicator 153 was made available for this study through the cooperation of Dr. L. L. Garner, Milwaukee. 4. Tracerlab, Inc.: Instruction Manual Pertaining to the Use of the RA-1 Medical Applicator, Serial No. 29, 1951. 5. Friedell, Thomas, and Krohmer.1 Tracerlab, Inc.4 6. Wilson, F. M.: Beta Irradiation: Evaluation of Radium-D Applicator for Ophthalmic Use , Am. J. Ophth. 33:539-548 ( (April) ) 1950. 7. Hughes, W. F., Jr., and Iliff, C. E.: Effects of Beta Irradiation on the Rabbit's Eye , Am. J. Roentgenol. 56:502-512 ( (Oct.) ) 1946. 8. Kahn, M.: Unpublished data from the University of Illinois College of Medicine; cited by Hughes, W. F. Jr.: Beta Radiation Therapy in Ophthalmology, to be published. 9. (b) Hughes, W. F., Jr.: Beta Radiation Therapy in Ophthalmology, to be published. 10. Stevenson, W.: An Ophthalmic Applicator for Beta Radium-D , Mississippi Valley M. J. 70:242 ( (Nov.) ) 1948. 11. Wilson, F. M.: Applicators for Beta Irradiation of the Eye , Am. J. Ophth. 35:645-656 ( (May) ) 1952. 12. These values are for the applicators used in this study only, and do not necessarily apply to other, similar applicators.

Journal

A.M.A. Archives of OphthalmologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Dec 1, 1952

References

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