Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You and Your Team.

Learn More →

Racial Segregation and Inequality of Care in Neonatal Intensive Care Units Is Unacceptable

Racial Segregation and Inequality of Care in Neonatal Intensive Care Units Is Unacceptable Opinion Editorial Racial Segregation and Inequality of Care in Neonatal Intensive Care Units Is Unacceptable Elizabeth A. Howell, MD, MPP; Paul L. Hebert, PhD; Jennifer Zeitlin, DSc, MA Despite significant improvements in the survival of very pre- prove outcomes. While the use of administrative data, such as term newborns in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) over state discharge abstract data linked with birth certificate data, the last decade, significant racial and ethnic disparities exist allow for population-based estimates, these administrative data 1-3 for very preterm infants. While these disparities are rooted lack many of the data elements necessary to measure quality in a complex web of factors, more directly (eg, receipt of medications, vital signs, and a growing body of evidence growth). Related article page 455 Another strength is the use of a national data set that in- has documented the role of quality of care in creating disparities. Black and Hispanic very cludes nearly 90% of very low-birth-weight and very preterm preterm infants are more likely to be born in hospitals with infants born annually in the United States, making it possible worse outcomes than white infants after adjustment for risk to confirm that previous findings from specific http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA Pediatrics American Medical Association

Racial Segregation and Inequality of Care in Neonatal Intensive Care Units Is Unacceptable

Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-medical-association/racial-segregation-and-inequality-of-care-in-neonatal-intensive-care-Ov0okTCXbs
Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2019 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
2168-6203
eISSN
2168-6211
DOI
10.1001/jamapediatrics.2019.0240
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Opinion Editorial Racial Segregation and Inequality of Care in Neonatal Intensive Care Units Is Unacceptable Elizabeth A. Howell, MD, MPP; Paul L. Hebert, PhD; Jennifer Zeitlin, DSc, MA Despite significant improvements in the survival of very pre- prove outcomes. While the use of administrative data, such as term newborns in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) over state discharge abstract data linked with birth certificate data, the last decade, significant racial and ethnic disparities exist allow for population-based estimates, these administrative data 1-3 for very preterm infants. While these disparities are rooted lack many of the data elements necessary to measure quality in a complex web of factors, more directly (eg, receipt of medications, vital signs, and a growing body of evidence growth). Related article page 455 Another strength is the use of a national data set that in- has documented the role of quality of care in creating disparities. Black and Hispanic very cludes nearly 90% of very low-birth-weight and very preterm preterm infants are more likely to be born in hospitals with infants born annually in the United States, making it possible worse outcomes than white infants after adjustment for risk to confirm that previous findings from specific

Journal

JAMA PediatricsAmerican Medical Association

Published: May 25, 2019

References