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Racial and Environmental Factors in Susceptibility to Rhus

Racial and Environmental Factors in Susceptibility to Rhus Abstract For reasons that are obscure at this time, certain dermatoses have racial or geographic peculiarities of distribution. The Negro is considered to be comparatively immune to basal-cell epitheliomas but particularly susceptible to the annular syphilid. Howard Fox,1 after a study of 2200 Negroes and an equal number of whites, reached the conclusion that the Negro is less susceptible to external contacts. To quote his article of 1908: An example of lessened susceptibility to vegetable irritants is given by my statistics for poison by the Rhus toxicodendron, which showed 22 cases in the white against 8 in the black. While these figures show a much greater prevalence of ivy poisoning in the white, the disproportion in my opinion would have been much greater in a comparison of whites with full-blooded Negroes. In replying to the question, "Is the Negro immune to ivy poisoning?" the answer, "I have References 1. Graham, H., of Graham Laboratories, Dallas, Texas. 2. Supplied by Irving Wershaw of Dome Chemicals, Inc., New York, in the form of Cort-Dome Creme. 3. Fox, H.: Observations on Skin Diseases in the Negro , J. Cutan. Dis. 26:67 ( (Feb.) ) 1908. 4. Hazen, H. H.: Personal Observations upon Skin Diseases in the American Negro , J. Cutan. Dis. 32:705 ( (Oct.) ) 1914. 5. Hazen, H. H.: Syphilis and Skin Diseases in the American Negro , Arch. Dermat. & Syph. 31:316 ( (March) ) 1935. 6. McNair, J. B.: Rhus Dermatitis from Rhus Toxicodendron, Radicans and Diversiloba , Chicago, University of Chicago Press, 1923. 7. Johnson, H. M.: Personal communication to the authors. 8. Arnold, H. L., Jr.: Personal communication to the authors. 9. Fujinami, T.: Personal communication to the authors. 10. Reiss, F.: Personal communication to the authors. 11. Allington, H. V.: Personal communication to the authors. 12. Urrere, E. R.: Personal communication to the authors. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png A.M.A. Archives of Dermatology American Medical Association

Racial and Environmental Factors in Susceptibility to Rhus

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1957 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0096-5359
DOI
10.1001/archderm.1957.01550140041007
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract For reasons that are obscure at this time, certain dermatoses have racial or geographic peculiarities of distribution. The Negro is considered to be comparatively immune to basal-cell epitheliomas but particularly susceptible to the annular syphilid. Howard Fox,1 after a study of 2200 Negroes and an equal number of whites, reached the conclusion that the Negro is less susceptible to external contacts. To quote his article of 1908: An example of lessened susceptibility to vegetable irritants is given by my statistics for poison by the Rhus toxicodendron, which showed 22 cases in the white against 8 in the black. While these figures show a much greater prevalence of ivy poisoning in the white, the disproportion in my opinion would have been much greater in a comparison of whites with full-blooded Negroes. In replying to the question, "Is the Negro immune to ivy poisoning?" the answer, "I have References 1. Graham, H., of Graham Laboratories, Dallas, Texas. 2. Supplied by Irving Wershaw of Dome Chemicals, Inc., New York, in the form of Cort-Dome Creme. 3. Fox, H.: Observations on Skin Diseases in the Negro , J. Cutan. Dis. 26:67 ( (Feb.) ) 1908. 4. Hazen, H. H.: Personal Observations upon Skin Diseases in the American Negro , J. Cutan. Dis. 32:705 ( (Oct.) ) 1914. 5. Hazen, H. H.: Syphilis and Skin Diseases in the American Negro , Arch. Dermat. & Syph. 31:316 ( (March) ) 1935. 6. McNair, J. B.: Rhus Dermatitis from Rhus Toxicodendron, Radicans and Diversiloba , Chicago, University of Chicago Press, 1923. 7. Johnson, H. M.: Personal communication to the authors. 8. Arnold, H. L., Jr.: Personal communication to the authors. 9. Fujinami, T.: Personal communication to the authors. 10. Reiss, F.: Personal communication to the authors. 11. Allington, H. V.: Personal communication to the authors. 12. Urrere, E. R.: Personal communication to the authors.

Journal

A.M.A. Archives of DermatologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Feb 1, 1957

References